King County prosecutor charges woman after false assault allegation of Bellevue police chief

Prosecuters charged the woman who made false allegations against the Bellevue Police Chief

The King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office has charged the woman who made false sexual assault allegations against the Bellevue police chief and former officers with two counts of malicious prosecution, and two counts of tampering with physical evidence.

On Dec. 13, Prosecuting Attorney for King County Daniel Satterberg submitted a formal accusation of four charges against Idunn Schneider to the Superior Court of Washington for King County.

Schneider is being charged with malicious prosecution for the accusation of Steve Mylett of rape, and for accusing former Bellevue officer John Kivlin of violation of a no contact order and witness tampering. Both Mylett and Kivlin were found innocent of the accusations. She is also being charged with tampering with physical evidence for presenting false physical evidence.

In August, Bellevue Police Chief Mylett was put on administrative leave due to the accusations and an investigation into the claims was led by the Bothell Police Department. Mylett was exonerated in October and the Bothell Police Department forwarded the case to the King County Prosecutor’s Office for review.

In a certification for determination of probable cause from the Bothell Police Department, the detective on the case outlined the facts and circumstances that the charges are based on. On July 30, Schneider reported the assault to the Bothell Police Department accusing Mylett of rape during an encounter in 2016. She signed each statement certifying the statements were true under penalty of perjury.

In a recorded phone call on Aug. 2, she confirmed the statements on the tape were true to the best of her knowledge. A week later, she provided the police a pair of underwear she claimed to have worn on the day of the rape for DNA testing. Schneider made another official statement and signed it under penalty of perjury.

Schneider claimed the rape occurred between the end of November and the first week of December 2016, and said she had received two emails from Mylett discussing their encounter before it happened. The Bothell detective found that Mylett did not live at his previous Bothell address during that time range. He moved out in October of that year and new tenants moved in quickly after. The tenants did not match the description Schneider gave.

On Sept. 21, the final Washington State Patrol lab report showed Mylett was not one of the donors of four individual sperm sections on the underwear.

On Oct. 10, a search warrant was approved from Microsoft regarding Schneider and Mylett’s emails. The detective did not find any correspondence between the two. The detective did find that Schneider had purchased two background search services and several burner phone numbers and additional phone lines. They also found 17 different versions of the two emails she claimed to receive from Mylett. The various emails showed that Schneider changed the content of the message including dates, times and email addresses before sending a final version to the Bothell Police Department claiming it was evidence.

The email address that Schneider claimed to have belong to Mylett was found to trace back to a website that spoofs emails, a process that disguises an email from an unknown source as a known address to the person receiving the message.

The prosecuting attorney’s case summary incorporated the Bothell Police Department’s determination of probable cause and requested a summons be issued to Schneider. The summary also requests Schneider to be ordered not to contact Kivlin or Mylett and to have no criminal law violations.

The arraignment is scheduled for Dec. 31 at the King County Courthouse.


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