Bellevue councilmember Jeremy Barksdale, CFH executive director David Bowling, Mayor Lynne Robinson and Deputy Mayor Jared Nieuwenhuis celebrate the opening of CFH’s permanent year-round men’s shelter on Jan. 13. Courtesy photo

Bellevue councilmember Jeremy Barksdale, CFH executive director David Bowling, Mayor Lynne Robinson and Deputy Mayor Jared Nieuwenhuis celebrate the opening of CFH’s permanent year-round men’s shelter on Jan. 13. Courtesy photo

Bellevue celebrates year-round emergency shelter opening

Congregation for the Homeless opened its first permanent year-round shelter Jan. 13.

Bellevue now has a permanent year-round men’s emergency shelter.

Bellevue leaders, business owners, developers, engineers, volunteers and supporters gathered to celebrate the recently completed retrofit of Congregation for the Homeless (CFH)’s men’s year-round emergency shelter on Jan. 13. The collaborative effort raised $827,000 to bring the shelter up to code.

“It’s an amazing feeling to finally have it,” CFH executive director David Bowling said. “It’s amazing to be a part of this.”

At the Jan. 13 ribbon-cutting event, Mayor Lynne Robinson said she was grateful to know there’s a place for homeless men to receive assistance.

“Now when we find a man sleeping or living outside we can direct him to this shelter, year-round, and know that he will receive the assistance he needs to recover, recuperate and thrive,” Robinson said. “I want to thank Kevin Wallace for all he has done to make this shelter possible, former Mayor Chelminiak for his leadership and support of this project, and I especially want to thank David Bowling and CFH for partnering with the city of Bellevue to address this critical need.”

Local developer and former Bellevue city councilmember Kevin Wallace highlighted the accomplishment by thanking multiple sectors of the community for coming together. Former mayor John Chelminiak reminded the crowd about the need for the community to again come together to support the exciting campus vision of the site next to Seattle Humane on Eastgate Way—the anticipated future permanent location of the emergency men’s shelter and services. As planned, that neighborhood campus also will include 300 units of affordable housing for families plus 80 units of housing for men and women exiting homelessness.

Last year, the city of Bellevue announced it would begin providing year-round emergency shelter for men starting in September 2019. The early start date was made possible by an agreement with Cloudvue to allow CFH to use their property at Northeast 8th Street and 108th Avenue Northeast as a temporary “bridge” shelter while the current shelter improvements were made. The “bridge” location has been used in the past by the CFH and the Sophia Way, a nonprofit working to support unhoused women in King County.

Bowling said he felt grateful to everyone who helped make the shelter a reality.

“Now we have a safer community. Men have a safer, more dignified place to go and receive help,” he said. “None of this could have been possible without the diverse group of supporters and resources.”

To learn more about CFH, go online to https://www.cfhomeless.org/.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Bellevue Police car
Bellevue police officer placed on administrative leave for social media posts

Department is investigating the posts, which included conspiracy theory about George Floyd’s death.

King County assessor wants Legislature to fix laws to help small businesses

Changes needed because of COVID-19 impact on commercial properties

File photo.
Bellevue police investigating fatal stabbings

The city announced in a news release an ongoing investigation of a June 1 domestic disturbance.

King County could be in Phase 2 in two weeks

The county is also hoping the state lets them reopen several businesses by Friday.

Bellevue lifts curfew scheduled through Saturday

The city no longer has a curfew in the downtown area, as of June 4

Bellevue Chamber CEO: Volunteers help with downtown cleanup

Update: They are not seeking additional volunteers at this time. Cleanup comes after a few stores in Bellevue faced property damage from looters.

Bellevue City Hall. Photo courtesy city of Bellevue
How is COVID-19 impacting Bellevue?

New King County data dashboard breaks down case rates, number of unemployment filings and more.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant on March 23. File photo
New guidelines for Phase 2 reopenings in King County

All workers will need to wear masks as restaurants, retail shops and other businesses reopen.

Most Read