Youth Symphony, Music Works Northwest link up

Two of the oldest music education organizations on the Eastside have begun a partnership. The Bellevue Youth Symphony Orchestra (BYSO) and Music Works Northwest (MWNW) are teaming up to create a percussion ensemble program to train young percussionists.

  • Monday, June 2, 2008 4:14pm
  • Life

Two of the oldest music education organizations on the Eastside have begun a partnership. The Bellevue Youth Symphony Orchestra (BYSO) and Music Works Northwest (MWNW) are teaming up to create a percussion ensemble program to train young percussionists.

The program will be coordinated through the BYSO orchestra programs, with rehearsals to be held at Music Works. Students who participate will perform on traditional percussion instruments, mallet keyboards, and hand drums under the direction of Scott Ketron, Artistic Director at Music Works.

Ruth Brewster, Executive Director of the BYSO had the idea to create a program that would attract more percussionists into the orchestras and build well rounded percussionists who will be able to play the more than 25 different percussion instruments that are often called for in orchestral music.

In addition to the orchestral training, students will form a percussion ensemble where they will explore literature that incorporates not only fundamental classical techniques and styles, but music and instruments from around the world.

“This is a healthy model where two musical organizations are using their strengths to create a stronger program than they could provide by themselves,” Ketron said.




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