Two Eastside friends develop a service provider application

Amin Shaykho and Marwan El-Rukby develop a local startup called Kadama.

Longtime friends Amin Shaykho and Marwan El-Rukby were determined to find a way to help their community. Many ideas and conversations were developed, but it was in a local gyro shop where their smartphone application, Kadama, was born. Kadama is an app that makes requesting services easier for consumers.

Kadama allows consumers to request and preform services such as yard work, house work, tutoring and pet care. Consumers also are able to negotiate prices with different service providers in the community. The Eastside startup is currently only available in IOS, but developers are working to perfect the app and expand it to all devices.

Both Shaykho and El-Rukby wanted to create something that benefited the community. And that’s what Kadama is designed to do.

To request a service, users submit a detailed request at their asking price. Users receive various offers from providers and search for high-rated providers. Choosing is easy by reviewing the rating, user asking price, and task description. To become a service provider, users create a provider profile that allows them to manage earnings, skills and current tasks. Users can request and become a service provider.

“We want to help the community. We want to to find as many ways to connect with the community and drive that value,” El-Rukby said.

The app has been in the works since 2016 and officially launched on June 11, 2018. Kadama currently has 600 users, 100 ratings, 1000 followers on social media and 20,000 views.

Shaykho said when they first started, the mission was to add efficiency and convenience to people’s lives.

“Marwan and I knew that it wasn’t going to be easy to start a company,” Shaykho said. “When I compare ourselves now with who we were two years ago, I still see two millennials who are eager to learn with huge goals.”

Service providers on Kadama are encouraged to develop new skills and go out and help their community.

“Kadama isn’t just an app, it’s a connector. A connector of jobs. A connector of people,” Shaykho said.

To learn more about Kadama, go online to www.kadama.com.

More in Life

Business perspective for the new year | Financial advice column

A monthly business column from a local financial adviser.

Embrace the struggle for a complete picture | Health column

A monthly column about mindfulness and general wellbeing.

KCLS continuing to build connections in 2020 | Submitted content

A monthly column about library happenings.

From left: students Riley Retinger, Abby Smith, Mimmi Hubbard and Sadie Rabinowitz. Photo by Calah Webb
‘It’s one of my favorite places to be’: School of Rock Issaquah gears up for January shows

In January, students will be paying homage to the Beatles, Black Sabbath, Chris Cornell and others.

Back row, from left: Eric Vaughn, Lisa Dreher and Hope Maltz, Hideo Fujita, Sheri Campbell, Warren Mainard. Front row, from left to right: Jenny Chang, Kendy Sasaki-Ross, Rob Kamihana and Monika Kannadaguli. Photo courtesy Eastgate Expounders
More than a speaking group: Eastgate Expounders look back at 15 years

Eastgate Expounders is one of many clubs under the overarching Toastmasters International nonprofit.

Photo courtesy of Larry Snyder
                                Larry Snyder collected 4,334 pairs of socks during his fourth annual sock drive in Bellevue.
Answering the call to serve those in need

Fourth Annual Sock Drive donates 4,334 socks to CFH, The Sophia Way and Dignity for the Divas.

Photo by Nityia Photography
Three simple rules for the holiday | Health

A monthly column about mindfulness.

Nancy Kartes and Bill Willard were both original event planners of the garden light show that opened in 1994. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo
Twenty-five years of Garden d’Lights

Garden d’Lights runs through December 31.

Boy Scout Troop 626 kicks off Christmas tree sale

The fundraiser began on Nov. 29 and ends on Dec. 20.

Photo courtesy city of Bellevue
                                Volunteer Rob Polasek at work. The Master Naturalist program currently is accepting applications.
Master Naturalist program connects people to environment, community

The program, which enables community members to work with the parks department, started in 2009.

Photo courtesy of city of Bellevue
                                Photo from evening Cultural Conversations event.
Cultural Conversations program approaching 10th year of bringing women across the Eastside together

For nearly a decade, the program has sought to foster inclusivity and togetherness.