Kaki King performs her latest show “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” which fuses a mesmerizing light show with King’s melodic guitar compositions. Photos courtesy of Simone Cecchetti

Kaki King performs her latest show “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” which fuses a mesmerizing light show with King’s melodic guitar compositions. Photos courtesy of Simone Cecchetti

Kaki King brings colorful performance to Kirkland

The project fuses visual storytelling with King’s guitar melodies.

A lone figure sits on stage with a stark, white guitar and begins to play. The stage goes black before the guitar explodes with light and flashes images of ocean waves, buzzing wildlife and electricity.

This is solo guitarist, Kaki King’s unique project that fuses guitar melodies and visual storytelling into an innovative performance that she’s bringing to the Kirkland Performance Center (KPC).

The unique performance, “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” utilizes projection mapping to cast colorful textures, shapes and “visions of genesis and death” onto King’s guitar, which was customized specifically for the project.

“No one else is doing projection mapped guitar work, playing and composing the way I do,” King said. “Expanding the visual aspect of the guitar was a natural way to keep pushing the boundaries of the instrument.”

King has released eight albums, performed with numerous bands, including Foo Fighters, Timbaland, and The Mountain Goats and contributed to a variety of film and TV soundtracks including Golden Globe-nominated work on Sean Penn’s “Into The Wild”.

Currently, King is on a world tour and will visit the KPC on April 5. Her first album, “Everybody Loves you”, was released in 2003 and she hasn’t stopped developing her art since then.

“I never had a grand scheme,” she said. “I just kept taking the next right step. Kept working and trying and experimenting. Same thing still works for me today.”

“The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” is her latest project, which King created in 2014. The entire show revolves around King’s signature Ovation Adamas guitar. King created a visual experience that is projected onto her guitar, throughout the hour-long performance, as she plays.

“I’m a guitarist and I try to push the boundaries of the instrument as far as I can,” King said.

King added that she’s grown a lot over her 15-year-old career. Originally, she said she didn’t even want to perform for a living.

“The idea terrified me,” she said. “I just ended up having to quit all my other jobs because eventually touring and performing was taking up all of my time.”

The music hasn’t been King’s only change over her career. She started out as a self-described “lonely depressed gay teenager” and is now a married woman with two children.

“Some of my early work was the best because there was no pressure for it to be great or do or say anything,” King said. “I will say I’m a much more stable and well adjusted human being, but most people can say that of themselves between 23 and 38.”

King added that there was an unfortunate shift in her fan base throughout her career. She said she lost an intimacy with her following as it grew.

“It was sad when I realized things had changed,” King said. “I used to have fun times hanging with fans early on—back when there would be 30-40 people at a gig. Now due to the actions of some super weirdos I have to protect myself a lot more. I’m an open person but I have to be careful who I’m letting into my world sometimes.”

King has been touring with this project since 2014 and has numerous shows scheduled throughout the country throughout April.

Currently, her final tour date is scheduled for Aug. 10 in Australia. Afterwards, King plans to spend some time with her family before working on her next projects.

“I’m excited for my son to start walking, talking and eating solid food, and I want to teach my daughter to read,” King said. “After that, I’ll focus on more art.”


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Kaki King performs her latest show “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” which fuses a mesmerizing light show with King’s melodic guitar compositions. Photos courtesy of Simone Cecchetti
                                Photo courtesy of Simone Cecchetti

Kaki King performs her latest show “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” which fuses a mesmerizing light show with King’s melodic guitar compositions. Photos courtesy of Simone Cecchetti Photo courtesy of Simone Cecchetti

Kaki King performs her latest show “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” which fuses a mesmerizing light show with King’s melodic guitar compositions. Photos courtesy of Simone Cecchetti
                                Photo courtesy of Simone Cecchetti

Kaki King performs her latest show “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body,” which fuses a mesmerizing light show with King’s melodic guitar compositions. Photos courtesy of Simone Cecchetti Photo courtesy of Simone Cecchetti

More in Life

Deyonté Weather Collection available to view during Fashion Week. Courtesy photo/The Bellevue Collection
Fashion Week at the Bellevue Collection is available virtually and in-person

Proceeds for its online runway shows go to Bellevue LifeSpring.

Diya Garg, left, distributes Mighty Crayon recycles crayons and coloring books for Seattle students. Courtesy photo/Diya Garg.
Getting crayons to kids runs in the family

Eastside nonprofit Mighty Crayon is relaunched by younger sister of founder, repurposing used restaurant crayons

2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat. Courtesy photo
2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat | Car review

Ford’s venerable compact Ranger pickup went away for a while. But it… Continue reading

Courtesy photo
Sign up for 2020 ‘Run to Rwanda’ Fun Run slated for September

Clyde Hill resident Sophie Sharp, an 11th grade student at The Overlake… Continue reading

Washington State Fair cancelled

COVID-19 outbreak claims another event

TLG Motion Pictures CEO Erik Bernard and TLG founder Courtney LeMarco on a set. Photo courtesy TLG Motion Pictures.
Local production company seeking film, TV pitches from young minority creatives

The Big Pitch competition, put on by TLG Motion Pictures (“Hoarders”), started about six months ago.

Local musicians hold virtual benefit concert for mental health

The stream-a-thon supports NAMI Eastside and nonprofit Hold Your Crown

Bellevue skyline. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Food Lifeline giving out emergency food boxes at Bellevue College, other Seattle-area locations

The nonprofit is working to help mitigate hunger amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Medic One Foundation’s Gratitude Meals offer support to first responders, local businesses

The initiative provides hearty lunches to first responders staffing the COVID-19 testing sites as they work to test their colleagues.

UW students create Spira app to gather COVID-19 data

The app was created to screen for respiratory diseases but the teen creators shifted their focus once the COVID-19 outbreak began.

‘Don’t assume it can’t happen to you’

Federal Way resident Evelyn Allcorn shares story of her husband’s battle with COVID-19 after he tested positive on March 28.

Meet The Bored Baker of Bellevue

Youth keeps busy with blog during down time from school closures.