Letters to the Editor, Oct. 19, 2018

Rep. Smith; Crazy Rich Asians; Bellevue council

Re-elect Rep. Adam Smith

In the upcoming congressional elections, we would like to remind our District 9 fellow citizens how important it is for our country and the world that we re-elect Rep. Adam Smith, ranking member of the Armed Services Committee, to the U.S. House of Representatives. In the era of our presidential “Twitter king,” we must keep Mr. Smith’s goodness, wisdom and common sense working diligently for all.

Mr. Adam Smith’s many years of dedicated legislative work supporting public education, fair housing, fair taxes, quality health care, veterans and the active duty U.S. military are true national treasures. Mr. Adam Smith’s re-election is vital for our freedom and prosperity. Being independent voters, we value integrity, character and competency in an elected official, regardless of political party. Rep. Adam Smith of the 9th District is an elected official of honor and perseverance who works tirelessly for all Americans. We must re-elect him this November.

James A. Nelson and Marylil V. Nelson

Bellevue

“Crazy Rich Asians” praise

I have high praise as a movie lover for the versatile entertainment industry introducing to audiences an engaging, insightful and fun film such as “Crazy Rich Asians.”

It was truly refreshing to see a film that features an all-Asian cast and shines a deserving spotlight on the multifaceted talents of Asian entertainers. It makes me feel at ease knowing dedicated and outspoken individuals continue to tirelessly advocate and ensure that respect and credit is given when it is due to people of color entertainers, when at times their artistic craft tends to be overlooked and overshadowed by people’s cringeworthy stereotypes, biases and prejudices.

The movie resonated with me because it piqued my interest in learning more about Asian culture, especially with the fact I am of part Filipino descent. I look forward to with honest support and interest many more films featuring an all-people-of-color cast.

Erica Hale

Bellevue

Council needs consistency

I read the great article by Evan Pappas in the Oct. 12 issue of the Bellevue Reporter about the city council’s concern about Bellevue’s disappearing tree canopy coverage and had to wonder how much memory and attention span the city council members have from meeting to meeting.

How could they be concerned about the diminishing tree canopy coverage when just months earlier, they gave council’s OK to let Puget Sound Energy decimate 300 trees to do something that really didn’t need to be done (according to a variety of experts in the field, and not just the self-justifying PSE). Oddly enough, this opinion was further reinforced in the same Bellevue Reporter issue Pappas’ article was published, by Dr. David Schwartz in his letter to the editor on “PSE obscures the facts.”

It has been said that the mark of a true non-functional organization is indicated by the number of times it changes directions in its operations, i.e., not keeping its focus on the goal. By this definition, it has to be said that our city council is “non-functional” and is having a difficult time determining what it should do in its — for lack of a better term — “leadership” role.

How about acting like leaders, for a change, and developing some goal continuity instead of simply “reacting” to what the latest thing is that comes across their desks? If canopy coverage is important to the city council, it is important for a long time and not just except when a large foreign-owned utility wants to drive a power line through the area, at customer expense, to meet a future business goal that it may have of supplying electricity to Canada.

Dale Gunnoe

Bellevue

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