Letters to the Editor, Nov. 9, 2018

Partisan violence; seniors vote

Chickens home to roost

The chickens have had a field day for past two years. They puffed up their feathers and clucked around menacingly, climbed fence posts and crowed with in-your-face defiance, spread their wings pretending to be eagles soaring with pride. But now, as chickens always do, one by one they are coming home to roost.

The tax cut chicken came home to $1 trillion yearly deficits for foreseeable future.

The Supreme Court of the United States chicken energized a generation of women to say with one voice “Enough.” And history shows that when women rise up, they win. Their source of power is moral courage, not violence. Their focus is nothing less than equality for all, not tomorrow’s election.

The nine-year long repeal/damage/undermine Obamacare chicken now has their proponents running for cover, desperately trying to make voters forget their past repeated actions (“Can we please talk about the caravan”).

There are too many other chickens to mention here. But it would be remiss, especially today, not to mention the meanest ugliest rooster among them. Remember “…. If she gets to pick her judges, nothing you can do folks. Though (for) the Second Amendment people, maybe there is …,” or the redefinition of “Good people.” That chicken has been homeward bound for some time. According to Anti-Defamation League there was a 57-percent rise in hate crimes from 2016 to 2017, and we are on track to exceed that in 2018. And with unprecedented violence on a national scale, that ugly rooster may have finally arrived.

Today we mourn. But tomorrow we must act.

Sankar Ray

Sammamish

Seniors represent

As of 9 p.m. on Nov. 5, 97 percent of eligible voters at the Silver Glen Cooperative (for residents 55 years or older) in east Bellevue had voted. Our oldest voter was 97 years old. We hope that by the end of Election Day to have 100 percent. Some very active members of Silver Glen have worked hard to encourage (and badger) people to exercise this important right of citizenship. There are posters all over the public areas encouraging people to vote. Folks are provided stickers for their doors when they have voted.

Washingtonians are fortunate to live in a state that has statewide mail-in ballots which makes it very easy to vote. We can also track our ballots online to ensure they have been counted.

As seniors, we would love to see the same percentages from the younger voters in our community — and beyond.

Skip Dockstader

Bellevue

More in Opinion

Honor those who went before | OPINION

These officials and many others served with distinction even on the occasions when you disagreed with them.

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Despite ruling on Public Records Act, we need to keep a close eye on Olympia

Washington Supreme Court upholds that state legislators are subject to the Public Records Act.

Republicans chose political power over the Constitution | OPINION

I’m astounded and appalled that members of both parties in Congress were… Continue reading

Samantha Pak/staff photos
                                Above, Josh Gibson is in Bellevue College’s Neurodiversity Navigators program and it has helped him stay in school after five unsuccessful attempts. Below, Abby Leaver enrolled at Bellevue College after learning about the Neurodiversity Navigators program.
Helping neurodivergent students navigate higher education | Windows and Mirrors

The Neurodiversity Navigators program at Bellevue College offers various services to students who are on the autism spectrum.

When asked their opinion on contract talks, they were silent | OPINION

A 2017 law lets lawmakers offer negotiation topics. But a bipartisan panel didn’t do so this week.

Changing systems doesn’t happen overnight | Windows and Mirrors

It’s been a year since the Menchie’s incident and here is what the city of Kirkland has been working on since then.

Our newspapers have many reasons to be thankful | EDITORIAL

Changes have had positive impacts, readers offering support.

Traffic passes over the 90-year old Magnolia bridge, aging and in need of replacement, Wednesday in Seattle. State and local governments could end up scrambling to pay for road paving and other transportation projects as a Washington state measure that would cut car tabs to $30 was passing in early returns Tuesday. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Post-election, new battles loom over Eyman’s car-tab measure

Lawmakers will wrangle over cuts in transportation spending as lawyers tangle on the measure’s legality.

From a place of respect | Windows and Mirrors

What does it mean to share your culture with others?

Mental health: One size does not fit all | Windows and Mirrors

The challenges of providing mental health services for communities of color.

Letters to the Editor, Nov. 1, 2019

These letters were not published in print.