Chick-fil-A’s bad inspection was only a matter of time

It isn’t hard to believe that the uber popular Chick- fil-A restaurant that opened up here three months ago would eventually receive an unsatisfactory health inspection — and its customers should shoulder some of the blame.

It isn’t hard to believe that the uber popular Chick- fil-A restaurant that opened up here three months ago would eventually receive an unsatisfactory health inspection — and its customers should shoulder some of the blame.

As someone whose college career included working part time as a fast food employee, I can attest that I didn’t always follow the rules to a T.

The violations a public health inspector found at Chick-fil-A were mostly for failure to use gloves while prepping food and not changing out cleaning towels and sanitizing liquid. Then there wasn’t a proper log for the cooling procedure for the restaurant’s fried chicken.

These may seem like negligible issues, but they are also those that are most likely to cause foodborne illness.  The place wasn’t covered in  filth, and these violations could have easily been prevented and shouldn’t be expected to occur when the inspector comes around again.

The opening of Chick-fil-A in April caused a great migration to Bellevue that is now slowly tapering off; the restaurant still needs police officers to handle the traffic impacts it causes.

The copious health standards relating to the handling and serving of food can be exhausting and, as I found during my short stint at another franchise, time consuming. You try your best to keep up, but sometimes a crazy lunch rush will make a person prioritize moving out customers over tedious handwashing and glove changing.

By no means should people avoid eating at Chick-fil-A — unless you’re among a great number of those harboring resentment for its chief operations officer’s stance on homosexuality.

What people should be aware of is that their chicken is being made by people, many in their teens and early 20s.  They’ve taken on an amazing task of producing thousands of meals every day, the long line of cars doing nothing to discourage hungry customers.

If fast food is still fast, with a line of cars in the parking lot and a full restaurant, it’s your fault for assuming every rule is being followed meticulously.

 


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