.

Snoqualmie Tribe, partners, to open Eastside’s first community-based mass vaccination site on April 12

Located at Lake Sammamish State Park, it has capacity for up to 300 people per day.

The first community-based mass vaccination site in East King County will open on April 12 thanks to a partnership led by the Snoqualmie Tribe.

The mass vaccination site will be located at Lake Sammamish State Park, and is a continuation of the Snoqualmie Tribe’s vaccination clinic, which first opened in February.

The mass vaccination site will be called the Snoqualmie Tribe Vaccine Partnership. The cities of Issaquah and Sammamish, along with Eastside Fire and Rescue, will work together to administer shots.

Vaccines will be available by appointment only for people who qualify under current Washington state eligibility requirements. Snoqualmie Tribal members, staff and members of their household will continue to be eligible for appointments at the new clinic. A mobile vaccination unit run by Eastside Fire and Rescue will continue making visits to senior centers and other vulnerable populations who can’t make it to vaccine site.

“The Snoqualmie Tribe is proud to be able to provide these vaccines to individuals living in the Snoqualmie Tribe’s ancestral lands. In the 1860’s, the Snoqualmie people and other Northwest Natives experienced great loss as white settlers adopted a smallpox vaccine policy that discriminated against Natives,” Snoqualmie Tribal Chairman Robert De Los Angeles said. “Now, the Snoqualmie Tribe is exercising sovereignty through our Tribal values by caring for the people and communities living on our ancestral lands 160 years later during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The mass vaccination site will be run by Eastside Fire and Rescue personnel and trained volunteers. It can accommodate two rows of cars and has capacity to vaccinate up to 300 people a day, depending on vaccine supply.

Tribes across Washington state have been taking leading roles in distributing vaccines, both to Tribal members and the broader community. The Snoqualmie Tribe on March 18 held a vaccination event for people living on its ancestral lands. In Clallam County, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe expanded its vaccine eligibility to anyone 18 years or older on March 24.

Crosscut wrote that across the country, tribes have often been ahead of the curve in vaccinating their memberships. So much so that many have started offering vaccines to those beyond their communities. As sovereign nations, tribes are allowed to allocate vaccines as they see fit.

More information on how to register on the Snoqualmie Tribe Vaccine Partnership, and the Snoqualmie Tribe, can be found here: https://snoqualmievaccine.snoqualmietribeweb.us/




In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

NW Carpenters Union members strike in front of downtown Bellevue construction site (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
Carpenters union strike interupts some prominent Eastside construction projects

Union representative says members are prepared to strike “as long as it takes.”

Map of proposed landfill expansion sites (screenshot from King County website)
Waste management expert knocks county’s plan to expand landfill

The waste management advocate said the decision to expand seems pre-determined despite assessment.

Participants in fundraiser previous event (courtesy of Alzheimer’s Association Washington State Chapter)
Walk To End Alzheimer’s returns to Eastside on Sept. 25

Alzheimer’s Association moves forward with plans for an in-person event.

file photo
State employees including first responders sue state over vaccine mandate

The lawsuit filed on behalf of more than 90 plaintiffs claims Inslee’s order is unconstitutional.

Pixabay photo
Union carpenters to go on strike, expected to impact Eastside Microsoft projects

Members authorized strike after rejecting AGC offer for the fourth time.

file photo
The state’s hospitals face “unprecedented collapse” amid COVID uptick warn healthcare unions

Union spokeperson says understaffing was a problem even before the pandemic.

pizza from Tom Douglas’ Serious Pie (courtesy of Serious Pie)
Eastside to get its first Serious Pie restaurant location

Serious Pie is owned by Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas.

Axton Burton stands proudly in front of the greenhouse he made in his parent’s yard in Duvall, Wash. (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
How to make a greenhouse with 4,500 glass jars

How a Redmond resident spent nearly two years building a greenhouse out of salvaged materials.

Most Read