After a $30 million fundraising campaign and two years of building, Seattle Humane opened their new 3-story, 57,000-square-foot facility in December 2017. The new facility is home to thousands of pets who enjoy cleaner environments as they wait to be adopted. Raechel Dawson/staff photos

After a $30 million fundraising campaign and two years of building, Seattle Humane opened their new 3-story, 57,000-square-foot facility in December 2017. The new facility is home to thousands of pets who enjoy cleaner environments as they wait to be adopted. Raechel Dawson/staff photos

Seattle Humane’s new facility houses more animals, cleaner environment

The $28.5 million facility is 57,000 square feet.

Upon entering Seattle Humane’s new $28.5 million facility, future pet adopters are greeted with adoption specialists there to help find a perfect match. But the adoption center is not just a place to profess one’s need for a cuddly friend.

There is also a “Mudlet,” or mini Mud Bay store, that is stocked to the brim with cat and dog toys, treats and bedding. And 100 percent of its sales are donated back to Seattle Humane.

After all of the forms are filled out, future pet owners are taken to the cats on the main level or down below to the dogs. The new shelter, which opened in December 2017, can hold 156 dogs, 213 cats and 15 critters — or 10 percent more than its previous building. That doesn’t include the more than 4,000 animals in the care of the shelter who received foster care in homes of volunteer foster parents. These pets tend to be underage puppies and kittens who require bottle feedings; senior pets who needed a break from shelter life; and pets recovering from surgery.

While this upgraded facility can hold more animals for adoption, Amanda Anderson with Seattle Humane said the most important changes, are the improvements to the animals’ living quarters. Clean air ventilation systems, larger kennels and cubbies and the use of sound dampening technology to create a calmer, quieter environment all drastically improve the quality of life for pets during their stay at Seattle Humane. There are also multiple dog runs, which means more outside time for dogs.

On the complete opposite side of the 57,000-square-foot facility is a veterinary clinic. It’s there that animals get spayed and neutered, microchipped, vaccinated and their teeth cleaning. At 98.61 percent, Seattle Humane’s life-saving rate continues to be one of the highest in the nation.

The new clinic accommodates six surgical tables compared to its previous two tables packed together in a small clinic room.

Last year, students from Washington State University performed more than 5,100 surgical procedures at Seattle Humane’s veterinary clinic. Students typically come to Seattle Humane for two weeks to gain practice with spaying and neutering.

“Ever since animals first entered our new shelter, pets and people alike have thrived in the new building,” said David Loewe, CEO of Seattle Humane. “A big thank you from our paws to yours for helping us provide support and care for more than 7,500 pets because of your generosity. We can hardly wait to share the number of lives impacted in 2018.”

Established in 1897, Seattle Humane embarked on a $30 million campaign (with 2,000 private donors) to build the shelter to replace its aging facility in 2011. It took seven years of planning and fundraising, and nearly two years of construction before the dream became a reality. The new facility will now allow them to care for 10,000 animals every year.

For more information or to adopt a pet, visit www.seattlehumane.org.


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Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

Raechel Dawson/staff photo

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