Newport student wins first place technology prize at Broadcom MASTERS

Newport student wins first place technology prize at Broadcom MASTERS

Lui designed an RFID system to enhance school safety; wins top technology prize in competition.

Gabriella Lui of Newport High School recently won the first place award technology award at the Broadcom MASTERS, the nation’s premier STEM competition, on Oct. 23.

As previously reported, Lui was selected to be one of the top 30 finalists for the competition for her project that uses radio frequency identification (RFID) to enhance school safety.

The project works to track students’ locations in the case of a school emergency such as a natural disaster or a school shooting. The system would allow school officials and first responders to quickly find and treat students in such circumstances.

The Broadcom MASTERS encourages middle school students to translate their personal interests into a passion for STEM by participation in science fairs — the aim is to inspire them to continue their studies throughout high school and college and enter STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers.

Lui and 29 other finalists traveled to Washington, D.C. Oct. 19-23 and participated in competition leveraging project-based learning to test and demonstrate mastery of 21st century skills of critical thinking, communication, creativity and collaboration in each of the STEM areas.

Lui said her experience as a Broadcom MASTERS finalist was “truly invaluable.”

“Although these activities were supposed to be part of a competition, I had so much fun that I totally forgot that we were actually ‘competing’ against each other,” she said. “Although my Broadcom MASTERS journey started out as a required school assignment science fair project; an A on my transcript is nothing compared to this opportunity for me to cultivate my passion and interest in STEM. Broadcom MASTERS taught me that the true essence of science is learning, sharing and working with others. I’m really grateful for the honor, awards and certificates that come with being a Broadcom MASTERS alumni. However, the once in a lifetime experiences I gained, the things I learned, and the friendships I’ve made this past week are invaluable.”

In addition to being judged on their projects, the 30 finalists competed in hands-on challenges that tested their abilities in STEM, critical thinking, communication, creativity and collaboration. Challenges included designing a new type of shark tag; designing, coding and building a functional program using Raspberry Pi and Sense Hat; and determining how long it would take a zombie pathogen to infect the world’s population.

Lui said she was shocked to learn she had won the first place technology award because she was among such intelligent and passionate peers.

“I was prepared not to receive any awards due to how smart everybody else was, so I was in a complete stage of shock and immense happiness when the emcee announced that I had won the first place technology award,” she said. “My friends and fellow finalists were all so excited and cheering me on, and it was such a great feeling and honor to win first place award in technology.”

With the first place technology award, Lui received $3,500 to her choice of a STEM summer camp experience in the U.S. and an iPad.

She said she wants to encourage more people to join STEM and explore different things based on their interest.

“When I first started my project, I wasn’t even sure if I had the ability to prove my hypothesis, let alone to engineer a complete safety system. But I continued working on it because I thought it was fun and I enjoyed it,” she said. “This project was able to bring me from my school fair to first prize technology award at the 2018 Broadcom MASTERS competition simply because I tried my best to make a positive impact helping people and I was doing what I love.”


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Photo via Pexels
King County residents needed for first respiratory study using Apple watches

UW study to help find if devices can detect early warning signs of acute respiratory infections, such as COVID-19 and flu.

Photo courtesy of Johnson and Johnson (jnj.com)
Johnson & Johnson vaccine halted in Washington over side effect

Following federal guidance, Washington health care providers are temporarily pausing Johnson &… Continue reading

File Photo
High court ruling spurs effort to retool state’s drug laws

Meanwhile, the Blake decision has gotten people out jail, charges dismissed and possibly clemency for some.

t
Bellevue blanks Mercer Island on the girls soccer pitch

Bellevue’s Morgan Pingree (12) controls the ball while Mercer Island’s Addie Goepfert-Waterman… Continue reading

T
Sheriff’s office wants help identifying Green River killer victim

Staff reports In 2003, Gary Ridgway, Washington’s notorious Green River killer, pleaded… Continue reading

Sandwich selection at Tres Sandwich House (photo credit: Cameron Sheppard)
Bellevue’s Tres Sandwich House offers popular Japanese-style sandwiches

The shop is one of the only places to try the sandwiches outside of Japan.

King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg. File photo
King County needs more lawyers to attack backlog of cases

6,107 open cases is double the normal amount for King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office.

Public Health – Seattle & King County staff administering COVID-19 vaccine to a local emergency responder. COURTESY PHOTO, Public Health-Seattle & King County
Starting April 15, everyone 16 and older is eligible for a vaccine

Gov. Inslee said an expected increase in vaccine supply enables the state to open eligibility.

A CVS pharmacist prepares a COVID-19 vaccine at Village Green Retirement Campus in Federal Way on Jan. 26. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
Phase Finder for vaccine eligibility to be eliminated March 31

Eligibility verification via Phase Finder no longer required for appointments, vaccinations beginning this week.

file photo
Bellevue Police arrest man involved in fentanyl overdose death

Man who sold the deadly pills is being charged with controlled substance homicide.

Courtesy photo
Issaquah School District settles negligence lawsuit for $4.25 million

The lawsuit alleged the district covered for a now-convicted child molester while he was a teacher.