Photo courtesy city of Bellevue
                                From left, newly appointed Deputy Mayor Jared Nieuwenhuis and Mayor Lynne Robinson.

Photo courtesy city of Bellevue From left, newly appointed Deputy Mayor Jared Nieuwenhuis and Mayor Lynne Robinson.

New city leaders take the helm

Robinson and Nieuwenhuis secured the roles during the Jan. 6 council meeting.

Lynne Robinson and Jared Nieuwenhuis are now the mayor and deputy mayor of Bellevue, respectively.

Robinson, who succeeds John Chelminiak, has served on the council since 2014 and previously held the deputy mayor position.

“It’s an honor to be elected mayor, and I appreciate the support of my colleagues on the council,” Robinson said. “We have a strong council and an opportunity to do some really good work over the next two years. I’m anticipating great opportunities and challenges ahead.”

Nieuwenhuis has been on the council since 2018 and most recently fulfilled Pos. 4.

“I appreciate the opportunity afforded by my colleagues to serve as deputy mayor,” Nieuwenhuis said. “Bellevue is such a special place. In the years ahead we’re in the unique position to grow and flourish, while balancing what our community values: an incredible place to raise a family, start or grow a business or simply enjoy our tremendous parks. I look forward to working together, as a seven-strong council, to ensure that this high standard continues.”

Bellevue is structured as a council-manager government. The lead positions are elected by the council every two years.

The council updated appointment rules at a Dec. 9 meeting. With the adjustments, nominees now can be voted on concurrently rather than one at a time, and councilmembers can share their choices on a ballot instead of through a verbal confirmation.

As part of the process, Robinson, as deputy mayor, called for nominations at the Jan. 6 study session. Mayoral nominations do not have to be seconded; councilmembers also are allowed to nominate themselves for a given position.

Robinson earned the mayoral role through a unanimous vote. The deputy mayor nominees were Nieuwenhuis (nominated by Councilmember Conrad Lee) and Councilmember Janice Zahn (nominated by Councilmember John Stokes). Ultimately, Nieuwenhuis garnered the deputy mayor role through a 4-3 vote.

To watch the appointment, go to the Jan. 6 study session recording online (https://bit.ly/2R1gt7Q).


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