The Bellevue Neighborhood Liaisons. From left, Mark Heilman, Julie Ellenhorn, Carol Ross, and Theresa Cuthill. Courtesy Photo

The Bellevue Neighborhood Liaisons. From left, Mark Heilman, Julie Ellenhorn, Carol Ross, and Theresa Cuthill. Courtesy Photo

Neighborhood liaisons connect the citizens with their city

Providing residents with city information and resources.

With a city as large and as diverse as Bellevue, the needs and concerns of citizens can vary drastically between neighborhoods. That’s why the city has four Neighborhood Area Liaisons dedicated to working with community members, answering questions and taking feedback about all aspects of city activity.

Bellevue is comprised of 16 neighborhood areas split between the four liaisons employed by the city. It’s their job to know each of their neighborhoods well and interface with community members, organizations and business.

Mark Heilman, neighborhood outreach manager for the Community Development Department and one of the four liaisons, said residents often come to them with questions and it is their job to either find the answer, or connect them with the resources that would allow the citizens to find the answer. While they don’t know everything, Heilman said they know almost everyone in the city, so an answer is never too far away.

Questions can range from the “history of something going on in their neighborhood, to water services, or something that goes to a council decision that may go back five years,” he said. Liaisons can point people to archived information, or help collect the information citizens need.

Heilman works with Somerset, Newport and West Bellevue. Theresa Cuthill works with Crossroads, BelRed, Northeast Bellevue, Northwest Bellevue and Bridle Trails. Carol Ross works in Factoria, Eastgate, Cougar Mountain/Lakemont and West Lake Sammamish. Julie Ellenhorn covers Downtown Bellevue, Wilburton, Woodridge and Lake Hills.

The liaisons can also help address issues when the city is not involved. Heilman explained that a citizen once reported trash on a trail managed by King County on the north end of the city. King County was quickly contacted and cleaned up the mess.

Another example is after the February snow storm, each of the liaisons went to their neighborhoods to research and ask about how the city responded in each area, as well as how citizens would take care of each other. That feedback was collected as data that can be used to learn how the city can respond to similar events more effectively in the future.

Heilman said that if a resident has a question they should first look for the answer through the MyBellevue smartphone app. If further information is necessary the contact information for each of the four liaisons is available on the Neighborhood Area Liaisons page of the city’s website (https://bit.ly/2TgLFik).


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

School lunch. File photo
School district distributes thousands of extra meals amid pandemic

Congress hasn’t renewed the program, which provided twice as many student meals for free last spring.

Courtesy City of Bellevue
Main water line break in Bellevue

The city has not identified any contamination to main water line

The Enumclaw Health and Rehabilitation Center, which is located by St. Elizabeth hospital, a senior living community, and a nursing home. File photo
Inslee lifts visitation ban at long-term care facilities

Starting Wednesday, a four-phase plan will allow restrictions at nursing homes to gradually be relaxed.

Screenshot from Gov. Jay Inslee’s press conference on Aug. 5, 2020.
Inslee says schools in virus hot spots should stay closed

King County among high-risk counties; several school districts will have remote learning in the fall.

Photo by Porapak Apichodilok/Pexels
Bellevue reopens aquatic center

Swimmers must make reservations for pool use

King County Election headquarters in Renton on Aug. 4 for the primary election. Haley Ausbun/staff photo
Inslee and Culp lead governor race; incumbent Dems ahead for Congress | Statewide results

Early results for governor, state schools chief, attorney general and more.

Democrats dominate King County legislative races | Election results

Here are the latest results for King County legislative candidates in the… Continue reading

Inslee mask graphic
Free mask event for King County residents, Aug. 4 in Bellevue

The drive-thru distribution event will offer two masks per person

Primary election 2020: Who will emerge as Inslee’s challenger?

Voting ends Tuesday in an election without big rallies and fund-raisers and face-to-face debates

Sex ed, local control at heart of race for WA state schools chief

Incumbent Chris Reykdal faces five foes who argue he’s pushing too many state policies on school districts.

Inslee warns of stay home order as COVID cases rise

The governor urges young people, who are not getting infected the most, to curb their social habits.

Pandemic is spiking in South King County, governor says

Gov. Jay Inslee met with elected officials, health officials and business partners in Federal Way to hear concerns, suggestions about state’s response to COVID-19.