King County OKs new collaborative, regional animal control program

The Metropolitan King County Council on Monday approved the creation of a collaborative regional animal services program that spreads the cost of animal control, sheltering and licensing between 27 suburban cities and King County’s unincorporated communities, while providing for public safety and the humane care of animals.

  • Tuesday, June 22, 2010 12:25pm
  • News

The Metropolitan King County Council on Monday approved the creation of a collaborative regional animal services program that spreads the cost of animal control, sheltering and licensing between 27 suburban cities and King County’s unincorporated communities, while providing for public safety and the humane care of animals.

The Council’s adoption June 21 of the regional plan is the culmination of three years of work by the council and the County Executive to reform an animal services system that was criticized by numerous council studies. A joint cities-county work group formed in January by County Executive Dow Constantine developed the regional program that creates a partnership between the county and the suburban cities that contract with the county for animal services.

The Bellevue City Council is expected to OK the agreement tonight at its regular meeting.

The agreement defines services, expenditures, cost allocation methodologies and establishes a city-county committee to pursue innovative service improvements and cost reductions.

Under the legislation, cities will pay a greater share of the cost of the services with the goal of eventually covering all the costs now subsidized by the county. Cities will have an incentive to generate revenue by increasing the rate of pet licensing, the fees that now help fund the system. The county, in collaboration with the cities, will undertake entrepreneurial activities, seek partnerships with private animal welfare organizations, and increase donations and the use of volunteers and fostering.

The new regional model divides the county into four geographic districts for animal control services:

· Bellevue, Beaux Arts, Clyde Hill, Issaquah, Mercer Island, Newcastle, North Bend, Snoqualmie, and Yarrow Point

· Bothell, Carnation, Duvall, Kenmore, Kirkland, Lake Forest Park, Redmond, Sammamish, Shoreline, and Woodinville

· Kent, SeaTac, and Tukwila

· Auburn, Black Diamond, Covington, Enumclaw, and Maple Valley

Each of the districts also includes unincorporated areas of the County, and King County will continue to be responsible for the provision of services in the unincorporated areas as the local government provider.

Each region will have a dedicated field officer, who would be overseen by a field sergeant. Additional assistance will be provided by an animal cruelty sergeant to investigate cruelty cases and two officers on call after regular service hours for emergency response.

The legislation also includes revenue-generating opportunities that involve the public and regional businesses:

· It encourages citizen involvement through the creation of an Animal Bequest Fund, which will provide revenue to support animal services through donations. The fund can be used only for animal services and will be managed by the Director of the Department of Executive Services.

· It authorizes the Director of the Department of Executive Services to explore entrepreneurial opportunities through concessions, advertising, sponsorship, and naming-rights agreements with vendors to sell animal-related products and services. Proceeds would be applied to regional animal services.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Bret Chiafalo. File photo
Supreme Court says state can punish WA faithless electors

Justices: Presidential electors, including Everett man, must keep pledge to back popular vote winner

Gov. Jay Inslee issued new guidance allowing the resumption of self-service buffets, salad bars, salsa bars, drink stations and other types of communal food sources in Phase 2. File photo
Buffets and salad bars back on the menu in King County

Gov. Jay Inslee has revised rules to allow self-serve food areas in Phase 2 of the state’s reopening.

Bellevue City Hall. Photo courtesy city of Bellevue
Open seat on East Bellevue Community Council

Applications are due by Friday, July 24

Brian Tilley (left) and Katie Dearman work the wash station Friday at Kate’s Greek American Deli in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Governor’s no-mask, no-service order begins across Washington

“Just do not ring up the sale,” Gov. Jay Inslee said about customers who do not don the proper masks.

King County homeless count: 11,751 people, up 5 percent from 2019

One night a year, volunteers spread out across Seattle and King County… Continue reading

Free masks at the Bellevue Salvation Army. Courtesy photo
Free mask pickup for Bellevue residents

New dates and times for mask distribution this week

Nurse Sylvia Keller, pictured with Gov. Jay Inslee, is on the front lines of the COVID-19 battle in Yakima County. Courtesy photo
Governor doubles down on mask rules

Inslee: Starting July 7, businesses do not serve those who do not wear a mask

State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Politicians get pay raises, state workers get furloughs

A citizens panel approved the hikes in 2019. Unable to rescind them, lawmakers look to donate their extra earnings.

Construction begins for Downtown Park entrance

The previously delayed entryway project is expected to be finished early 2021

Most Read