Photos by Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing

Photos by Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing

King County Council approves $631 million emergency COVID budget

  • Friday, May 28, 2021 12:12pm
  • News

Staff reports

The King County Council approved a seventh round of emergency funding in response to COVID-19, this time totaling more than $631 million.

The supplemental budget, funded largely by the American Rescue Plan Act, is larger than all previous King County COVID budgets combined and will provide support for a variety of services as King County looks toward recovery from the pandemic and its many collateral impacts.

These investments align with the Council’s set priorities around housing stability and homelessness services, food security and access, mental and behavioral health, economic recovery, and workforce support, childcare and access to justice.

“Today we passed the largest supplemental budget in the history of King County,” said Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles, who is also budget chair. “This is transformational — providing support for the mother struggling to provide for herchild, for the renter on the edge of eviction, for the business owner getting relief from the new BIPOC economic resiliency fund, for the survivor of sexual assault or gender-based violence seeking justice, and many, many more.”

The major spending areas include:

• Community supports (e.g. food security, rental assistance, etc.): $255 million

• Vaccination Efforts including mass vaccination sites: $117 million

• Public health response to the pandemic: $114 million

• Economic recovery, jobs: $67 million

• County operations in response to the pandemic: $41 million

• Arts, entertainment, culture and science: $36 million

Of the total, $367 million will come from King County’s allocation of ARPA funds, $16 million from the General Fund, and $249 million from various revenue sources included state and FEMA grants.

“As more people are vaccinated, it seems we may be at the beginning of the end of one of the most horrendous, unnerving, and challenging times in our history,” Kohl-Welles said. “But COVID isn’t going away completely and people in our region are still suffering, especially in communities that have been disproportionately impacted by COVID, including refugee, immigrant, and BIPOC communities. This is why today’s passage of this supplemental budget is so critical, and I am proud to have supported it.”


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

file photo
County councilmember proposes study to understand rental housing supply, costs in unincorporated King County

If passes, study would attempt identify the effects of regulation on rental market.

screenshot taken from Scoop Marketplace website.
Scoop Marketplace looks to cut waste out of grocery economy

The all-bulk grocery has two locations, one in Kirkland and Renton

T
King County’s unemployment rate lower than most of Washington

South King County has been slower to recover compared to North King County.

Courtesy Friends of Lake Sammamish State Park.
Walk’n Wag returns to Lake Sammamish State Park

All proceeds will benefit improvements and beautification projects for Lake Sammamish State Park.

Seattle Children’s Hospital (Courtesy photo)
Seattle Children’s Hospital identifies racial disparities in infections, security response

The healthcare provider did not respond to multiple requests for data used to identify disparities.

Carpenters union members peacefully strike on Sept. 16 in downtown Bellevue (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
Carpenters union strike on pause after “illegal picketing activity”

Union spokesperson claims wildcat protestors harrassed and threatened violence.

t
Peter Rogoff to step down as Sound Transit CEO in 2022

Became CEO in 2016; search for replacement to begin

File photo/Sound Publishing
Ban on single-use plastic bags in WA begins Oct. 1

Shoppers will have the choice to pay for a reusable plastic or recycled paper bag.

Photos from Emma Artz Instagram page at https://www.instagram.com/emma__artz/?hl=en
Juanita HS student is one of the best downhill mountain bike racers in the world

Emma Artz represented the US in one of the most difficult bike races, placing in top-15.

Most Read