Child Care Resources providing parents ‘peace of mind’

A local woman shares her story of survival after suffering from domestic assault and how the organization helped get her and her son a life they couldn't have imagined otherwise.

She couldn’t breathe. Her vision blurred, then darkened into a shrinking tunnel as the father of their five-month-old child, continue to strangle her.

Releasing his grip, just before she lost consciousness, Andrea said she was able to call the police and shortly after he was arrested, but she was left not knowing what to do next.

“I knew I couldn’t stay there. I didn’t want to be in a place where he’d know where I was,” said Andrea, whose last name has be omitted to protect her identity. “I was homeless and jobless.”

With no family in the Bellevue area, Andrea and her son were placed in an emergency shelter and it was there she learned about a program that transformed her life forever.

Child Care Resources, a King County service agency dedicating to helping parents and families find stable housing as well as child care, began working with Andrea to establish and pay for responsible care for her son.

“How can I go to a job interview or even look for a job when I don’t have a safe place for my son to go? I had no way to pay for any sort of care,” she said. “If Child Care Resources weren’t helping pay for childcare I wouldn’t be able to do anything. I wouldn’t have made it otherwise.”

Five years after the 2009 assault, Andrea and her son have a place to live, she completed her advanced paralegal certificate and now working in a local law firm where she’s able to support the two of them.

“I finally have peace of mind,” she said. To know that the most precious thing in my life is taken care of. I’ve been able to further my career and take care of myself because there’s someone to help take care of my son.”

For more than a decade, the organization has helped thousands of families in King County get their lives back on track, said Terrie Yaffe, homeless program lead for Child Care Resources.

Andrea said even though she was homeless and jobless, she was treated with unexpected respect and encouragement from her caseworker.

“She was my advocate,” Andrea said. “They make you feel safe. You know they’re on your side. They’ve helping with thousands of dollars of bills for me and my son.”

Serving between 550 and 600 families annually, Yaffe said 40 to 60 percent each year are coming from domestic violence situations, living in emergency shelters.As the parents deal with the numerous, and often unexpected legal situations, the children are given a space where they can make new friends, where they can feel safe, and continue their education, she said.

“We’re an agency that looks at early education being vitally important for all children, and homeless children are no different,” she said. “The children are already experiencing the stresses of having to leave familiar situations, so this gives parents a chance to let their children know they’re finding a safe place for them … somewhere of their own where they feel they belong.”

Once a family has been selected for the program, the case workers, parent representatives or homeless child care representatives, identify nearby child care facilities, setting up meetings between the providers and the parents.

For the staff of Child Care Resources, the facility has to be a place of learning as well as caring, Yaffe said, not just somewhere where the children are sitting in front of a TV set all day.

Safety was something Andrea said she thought she may never feel again following the domestic assault, but because of her caseworker, everything changed.

“She provided me the means to move forward,” Andrea said. “There’s no way to repay that.”

Although the organization’s resources are limited, which can limit how many families are served, Yaffe said people’s donations go a long way to helping those in need.

Anyone in need of assistance is encouraged to contact the Homeless Hotline between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday at 206-329-5842.For information about how to make a donation, contact Susann Edmon at 206-329-1011 ext. 266.

Josh Stilts: 425-453-4290; jstilts@bellevuereporter.com


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Dr. Faisal Khan. Courtesy of King County.
Dr. Faisal Khan appointed as next King County health director

Dennis Worsham will continue to serve as interim director until September 6.

Teaser
King County experts discuss extreme heat mitigation plan

The plan includes improving infrastructure and communications to prevent future disasters.

King County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Satterburg (File Photo)
King County Prosecuting Attorney vows to protect reproductive freedom

Dan Satterberg joins over 80 prosecutors from around the country in their pledge.

Teaser
King County approves emergency grant after U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade

Washington is expecting an influx of people seeking abortions from out of state.

Fedor Osipov, 15, flips into Steel Lake in Federal Way during last year's heatwave on June 28, 2021. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
Heatwave expected to hit King County

Temperatures will likely reach 90 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, June 26, and Monday, June 27.

Judged by XII: A King County Local Dive podcast. The hands shown here belong to Auburn Police Officer Jeffrey Nelson, who has been charged with homicide in the 2019 death of Jesse Sarey.
JUDGED BY XII: Examining Auburn police officer’s grim tattoos

Episode 5 in special podcast series that explores Jeffrey Nelson’s role in the death of Jesse Sarey.

File photo.
Former Bellevue teacher sentenced in federal court over child pornography

Department of Justice says the man had 1,764 images of child sexual abuse in his possession.

Photo courtesy of King County.
Officials urge caution when swimming this summer

Cold spring temperatures and larger than normal snowpack have created dangerous conditions

File photo.
Bellevue man charged in 2019 assault that left a man dead on a Redmond roadway

After a two-year investigation, Bradley Hibbard was arrested for murder in the second degree.

Most Read