An elevated view of all-new Meydenbauer Bay Park. The grand opening will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 16. Photo courtesy of Manfred Seidler.

An elevated view of all-new Meydenbauer Bay Park. The grand opening will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 16. Photo courtesy of Manfred Seidler.

Bellevue celebrates Meydenbauer Bay Park Grand Opening

In the works for more than 30 years, Bellevue’s newest waterfront park is open.

In the works for more than 30 years, Bellevue’s newest waterfront park is open.

The city of Bellevue held a Grand Opening event for the recently completed Meydenbauer Bay Park on March 16.

The park features terraces for pedestrian walkways, an expanded swimming beach, picnic areas, a children’s play area, a beach house and restrooms, and a 400-foot curved pier extending into the bay.

Hundreds of Bellevue residents came to the park to experience the views and check out the new features. Patrick Foran, director of Parks and Community Services, led the grand opening event with a speech recounting the history of the project and the work that was put in to make the renovation a reality.

Bellevue Mayor John Chelminiak thanked everyone for the the time and effort put into the project and highlighted the connection between downtown and the bay.

“We are now connecting what I think is the most beautiful downtown in the state of Washington to one of the most beautiful bays on the lake that bears the state of Washington’s name, and it will be here for all of us to enjoy for many, many decades to come,” he said.

Meydenbauer Bay Park, located near Lake Washington Boulevard Northeast and 99th Avenue Southeast, has been a feature of the city of Bellevue long before its incorporation in 1953. At a city council meeting in February, planning manager Glenn Kost walked the council through a timeline of the park beginning all the way back in 1930, when the bay-side area was a swimming beach and park. In 1953, it became the city’s first park, Kost said.

In 1987, the city adopted a major waterfront park concept. To create that waterfront park, the city began acquiring property in 1992 and, according to Kost’s memo to the council, spent the next 15 years acquiring more property along the bay.

In 2010, the city council adopted a master plan and land use plan for the project. Seven years later the construction contract was awarded for phase one and was completed at the end of January 2019. Phase 2 planning was approved in the 2018 budget, Kost said, so staff will begin work on planning and design of phase 2 in the next year or two.

The park will be open from dawn to 11 p.m., Kost said, and the park will be lit with a series of lights along the pier and throughout the park after sundown.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Bellevue residents explore the new pier at Meydenbauer Bay Park during the grand opening event. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Bellevue residents explore the new pier at Meydenbauer Bay Park during the grand opening event. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

City councilmembers, staff, friends, and family all gather for the official ribbon cutting on phase 1 of the Meydenbauer Bay Park project. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

City councilmembers, staff, friends, and family all gather for the official ribbon cutting on phase 1 of the Meydenbauer Bay Park project. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

More in News

Washington scrambles to boost supply of life-saving protective items for healthcare workers

State officials say they had to be “creative” to obtain protective equipment in global demand.

Gov. Jay Inslee discusses the COVID-19 pandemic and the state’s response during a press conference on Thursday, March 26. Screenshot
Inslee: Stay-at-home orders must continue to completely eliminate COVID-19

Slight decrease in rate of new coronavirus cases, but residents must continue to hunker down.

At St. Elizabeth Hospital in Enumclaw, a patient is taken from an ambulance through a small door marked “decontamination” on March 23. It was unclear whether the patient was suspected of being infected with COVID-19. (Photo by Ray Miller-Still/Sound Publishing)
King County releases breakdown data of COVID-19 cases, deaths

Washington’s virus-related death toll surpasses 129 as of Wednesday, March 25.

Former Kent pro soccer team owner to face Kirkland rape charge

Dion Earl extradited from Arizona while doing time for sexual assault

Entrance to the Tukwila Library branch of the King County Library System on March 17. KCLS announced March 13 that it would be closed until April at earliest in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Mitchell Atencio/staff photo
KCLS pivots to digital during coronavirus pandemic

KCLS is dedicating more time and content to digital services while unable to open its physical locations.

POLICE BLOTTER

Police Captain assaulted after attempting to arrest hit-and-run suspect.

BPD arrests man on Washington’s Most Wanted

Daniel Alvarez has a history of eluding law enforcement.

King County suspends work release program

Effort taken to reduce jail population for safety of everyone during COVID-19 pandemic

Most Read