Start planting indoors now for summer harvest

Fill those indoor flats, seed trays, egg cartons and small plastic pots, because this is the week to start seeds indoors for setting out later. Warm-season crops like tomatoes, corn, cucumbers, peppers and eggplants need to be started six to eight weeks before the middle of May, which is when it is warm enough for them to survive outdoors. Yes, it is easier to just buy already-grown transplants of these crops from the nursery in May, but when you plant by seed you have many more choices when it comes to what to grow.

  • Monday, June 2, 2008 4:11pm
  • Life

Fill those indoor flats, seed trays, egg cartons and small plastic pots, because this is the week to start seeds indoors for setting out later. Warm-season crops like tomatoes, corn, cucumbers, peppers and eggplants need to be started six to eight weeks before the middle of May, which is when it is warm enough for them to survive outdoors. Yes, it is easier to just buy already-grown transplants of these crops from the nursery in May, but when you plant by seed you have many more choices when it comes to what to grow.

Vegetable-growing is enjoying a bountiful increase in popularity and a there is a bumper crop of reasons why. If you need convincing that this is the year to try growing your own vegetables, here’s some thought for food:

1 Home-grown food is safe.

With all the bad press about bad things that have been detected in even organic fruits and vegetables it is comforting to know that the lettuce in your own back yard hasn’t been sprayed with pesticides or been contaminated by farm yard bacterias.

2 Home-grown food is cheap.

Well, the seeds are cheap. I admit that if you need to rent equipment to till your ground, purchase topsoil or compost or start gardening from scratch, growing produce will cost you some money. But once you get over the initial investment, gardeners can grow lots of fresh food dirt cheap.

3 Home-grown tastes better.

Compare the flavor of a tomato from a pot on your patio to those pink golf balls they pass off as tomatoes in some grocery stores. Do the taste test on sweet corn (try the variety called Candy Corn) sold at a store against grown in your garden. There is an explanation about home grown food has more flavor. Home gardeners can grow the more flavorful varieties that the huge farms won’t grow because they may not ship as easily, grow as uniform in size or be more difficult to harvest with a machine.

4 Home-grown is fresher.

The classic recipe for the best ever corn on the cob is to boil a pot of water. Then run to the garden and shuck a few fresh ears. Immediately add to the water before the sugar inside those corn kernels begin converting to starch. Sweet! But home grown veggies and fruits also have more nutrition because they don’t spend time in transport or on a grocery shelf.

5 Home-grown uses less gas.

Not just less gas going to the store to pick up more lettuce or green beans but less energy to transport to the store then to your kitchen. Take a walk to your garden and make a meal of what’s in season.

So how do you start? Here’s the easiest way for beginning gardeners or those without a yard to become mini farmers. Go to pots. You can grow a bounty in containers as long as you have six to eight hours of sun, use a lightweight potting mix and remember to feed and water. Green beans growing up bamboo poles, tomatoes held up with wire cages and pots of salad greens just waiting to be cut and cut again are all easy projects for the first-time farmer.

All I am saying, is give peas a chance.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@bellevuereporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.bellevuereporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Life

2022 Telluride Nightfall Edition
Car review: 2022 Kia Telluride

By Larry Lark, contributor Big, bold and boxy, that’s the newly tweaked… Continue reading

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland
Car review: 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland

By Larry Lark, contributor With almost 30 years and four generations under… Continue reading

2022 Mini Cooper S 2-door. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2022 Mini Cooper S 2-door

By Larry Lark, contributor They don’t come around very often, but when… Continue reading

2021 Toyota Sienna Platinum hybrid minivan
Car review: 2021 Toyota Sienna Platinum hybrid minivan

By Larry Lark, contributor Minivans. They were at the top of the… Continue reading

2021 Honda Ridgeline AWD Sport
Car review: 2021 Honda Ridgeline AWD Sport

By Larry Lark, contributor Honda’s Ridgeline is the perfect vehicle for anyone… Continue reading

2021 Genesis GV80 Prestige
Car review: 2021 Genesis GV80 Prestige

By Larry Lark, contributor Genesis is branching out. With the introduction of… Continue reading

2022 VW Taos
Car review: 2022 VW Taos

By Larry Lark, contributor You know a market category is “hot” when… Continue reading

2022 Ford Bronco Sport
Car review: 2022 Ford Bronco Sport

By Larry Lark, contributor Enough time as past, since the OJ slow… Continue reading

2021 Mercedes-Benz GLA35
Car review: 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLA35

By Larry Lark, contributor The new 2021 Mercedes-Benz GLA35, the eighth model… Continue reading

2022 Subaru Outback Wilderness. Courtesy photo
Car review: 2022 Subaru Outback Wilderness

By Larry Lark, contributor Residents of the PNW are no strangers to… Continue reading