Sammamish Symphony Orchestra presents ‘Russkaya Dusha! (The Russian Soul)’

The performance will take place April 6 at Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue.

The Sammamish Symphony Orchestra, led by conductor and music director Adam Stern, will bring the music of Russia to Bellevue in April as they present their fourth concert of the season, “Russkaya Dusha! (The Russian Soul).”

The concert focuses on some of the most engaging Russian symphonic works by composers deeply influenced by the traditions, music and history of their culture. The program includes works inspired by Russian folk tunes including Mikhail Glinka’s “Kamarinskaya,” Anatol Liadov’s “Eight Russian Folksongs” and Vassili Kalinnikov’s “Chanson triste.”

Also featured are the exotic melodies of Alexander Borodin’s “In the Steppes of Central Asia” and the exuberant driving rhythms of Polovtsian March from his historical opera “Prince Igor.” The orchestra is also joined by Shiang-Yin Lee, the Sammamish Symphony’s principal cellist, who takes center stage for a performance of Alexander Glazunov’s emotional and melancholic “Chant du ménestrel.” And, rounding out the program is Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s Capriccio Espagnole with its lively melodies and dazzling orchestration, a fitting finale to the evening’s concert.

Shiang-Yin Lee, Cello: Shiang-Yin Lee received her Doctoral of Musical Arts from the University of Washington and Master of Music from the University of Texas at Austin. She has studied with Toby Saks, Ray Davis, Cordelia Miedel and Phyllis Young. She has participated in the Aspen Music Festival and did early music scholarship at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam. Lee performs with chamber groups around the Puget Sound and is a dedicated full-time educator. She teaches young people at the University of Puget Sound, Music Works Northwest (a non-profit community school), Pacific Northwest School of Music and Bellevue Youth Symphony Orchestra. She has lived in Sammamish since 2001.

Adam Stern, conductor and music director of the Sammamish Symphony Orchestra: Adam Stern, conductor and music director of the Sammamish Symphony Orchestra, is one of the region’s busiest musicians. He was appointed music director in the summer of 2015, after serving for several months as interim conductor, and brings more than 40 years of conducting experience to the orchestra. Since arriving in Seattle in 1992, he has been active as a conductor, composer, pianist, educator and lecturer. Under Stern’s leadership, local orchestras have given numerous world, U.S., West Coast and Northwest premieres to the Puget Sound community. Stern’s unique programming combines beloved masterworks with must-hear rarities; his programs are not merely concerts, but true musical events.

Sammamish Symphony Orchestra: Celebrating 26 years this season, the orchestra performs on the Sammamish Plateau, in downtown Bellevue and at various locations in the Seattle area. The Sammamish Symphony is committed to offering quality music at affordable prices for Eastside residents. The orchestra also performs two summer pops concerts free of charge. The volunteer ensemble provides the opportunity for talented, dedicated musicians to perform with a full symphony orchestra.

“Russkaya Dusha! (The Russian Soul)” will place at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 6 at Meydenbauer Theatre, 11100 NE Sixth St. in Bellevue. Tickets are on sale at SammamishSymphony.org for more information.


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