Meet the children redefining destiny in southern India

The public is invited to attend a lunch at the Bellevue Botanical Garden on March 31.

  • Thursday, March 29, 2018 4:30pm
  • Life

The public is invited to attend a lunch at the Bellevue Botanical Garden on Saturday, March 31 with students from Shanti Bhavan and Director of Operations, Ajit George.

The only educational program of its kind, Shanti Bhavan empowers children from India’s poorest communities to uplift not only themselves, but their families, out of generational poverty to a life of dignity and achievement.

The event kicks off at 12 p.m. with a light lunch. Shree and Visali, Glamour Woman of the Year in 2014, will share their stories and the impact that Shanti Bhavan has had on their lives.

Guests are invited to stay for a special screening of Daughters of Destiny, a documentary which depicts how the unique educational model of Shanti Bhavan equips its students to break out of the cycle of poverty.

Shanti Bhavan, a residential school in Southern India, represents a radical shift in non-profit education, providing 17 years of rigorous academics, leadership development and professional guidance completely free of charge.

The school’s graduates have a 100 percent university acceptance rate, work at Fortune 500 companies and contribute 20 to 50 percent of their salaries to their families and communities – helping end the poverty that has trapped India’s poorest communities for generations. Shanti Bhavan has been featured in media outlets including the New York Times, ABC World News, the Times of India, Glamour, The Seattle Met and King 5.

This is a free event but donations are welcome. For more information and to reserve your seat, visit shanti-bhavan.eventbrite.com.




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