From left, Kaavya Manam, Emerson Schrider and Ellen Chang of Happy Bubbles sold handmade bath and body products at the Children’s Business Fair in Bellevue on Aug. 31. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

From left, Kaavya Manam, Emerson Schrider and Ellen Chang of Happy Bubbles sold handmade bath and body products at the Children’s Business Fair in Bellevue on Aug. 31. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

Eastside youth entrepreneurs set up shop at Children’s Business Fair

Youth entrepreneurs donate a portion of their proceeds to charity of choice.

Bellevue residents Ellen Chang and Kaavya Manam and Mercer Island resident Emerson Schrider stood in front of their table for their business, Happy Bubbles, selling handmade products on Aug. 31 at Crossroads Mall in Bellevue.

The three young girls were among 20 other youth entrepreneurs participating in the annual Seattle Acton Business Fair. It was the third annual Acton Business Fair at Crossroads.

“Are you interested in trying our product? You can try a sample,” Chang, 10, said to a passing customer. “Do you want to try grapefruit, piña colada, peony or lavender?”

Chang took a customer’s hand and carefully scrubbed lavender bubble scrub on the back of her hand, as she explained the natural ingredients she used to make the scrub. Chang also explained how she draws on each jar to personalize each scrub.

“We made this for Mother’s Day in school one day and we thought it would be a good idea to sell it,” Chang explained.

Schrider, 10, said the hardest part about selling their product is keeping things organized and explaining what each product does to every customer. The three girls make their own products and come together to sell all things bubbles including, scrubs, bombs and salts.

Kaavya Mana, 10, of Bellevue sold bath salts at the Children’s Business Fair on Aug. 26. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

Kaavya Mana, 10, of Bellevue sold bath salts at the Children’s Business Fair on Aug. 26. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

The Happy Bubbles girls said it was their second year participating in the business fair. This year, they donated 20 percent of their proceeds to the Humane Society. Each youth entrepreneur donated to their charity of choice.

The business fair is one of the largest entrepreneurship events for kids in North America. The goal is to provide a platform for youth to become entrepreneurs for a day. Kids, ages 6 to 18, sell their products to customers at a one-day marketplace. Participants develop a brand, create a product or service, build a marketing strategy and then open for customers.

To learn more about Acton Business Fair, go online to www.childrensbusinessfair.org/seattle.


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Ellen Chang, 10, sold body scrubs at the business fair with her two friends. Their business, Happy Bubbles, sells all things bubble scrubs, bombs, and salts. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

Ellen Chang, 10, sold body scrubs at the business fair with her two friends. Their business, Happy Bubbles, sells all things bubble scrubs, bombs, and salts. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo
                                Rayed Siddiqui, 9, from Redmond sold handmade lego structures at the Children’s Business Fair on Aug. 26.

Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo Rayed Siddiqui, 9, from Redmond sold handmade lego structures at the Children’s Business Fair on Aug. 26.

A customer buys a candle from Ciara Reddy’s candle business on Aug. 31. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

A customer buys a candle from Ciara Reddy’s candle business on Aug. 31. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

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