The battle for public records | Jerry Cornfield | The Petri Dish

Those looking for a more transparent government are increasingly relying on public records to make it happen.They hope the more documents they obtain the clearer their view of what’s really going on behind closed doors in school districts, city halls and county buildings.

Those looking for a more transparent government are increasingly relying on public records to make it happen.They hope the more documents they obtain the clearer their view of what’s really going on behind closed doors in school districts, city halls and county buildings.

But there are those throughout the public sector convinced some of these Washingtonians are abusing the Public Records Act.

An alliance of government forces — whose members often are the targets of the records — tried unsuccessfully earlier this year to rewrite the act to make it easier to repel requesters whose motives they question.

With the help of Republican and Democratic lawmakers, they pushed a bill to make it easier for public agencies to block requests and to limit the time spent compiling records.

Though the bill died in the legislative process, the matter reappeared in the state budget in the form of a provision to spend $25,000 contemplating ways to help governments deal with records requests they consider harassing.

Lawmakers tapped the Ruckelshaus Center, a joint venture of the University of Washington and Washington State University, to facilitate a conversation between those in the alliance and those who viewed the failed bill as an unprecedented attack on citizens’ right to petition their government. By Dec. 15, the center is supposed to put forth recommendations.

Michael Kern, the center director, said this week the time frame is too tight to pull the parties together for fruitful face-to-face sessions. The game plan is to speak with 20 to 30 people who’ve been visible and vocal in the legislative conflict then prepare an assessment of the situation based on what center staff hears in the interviews.

“We’ll report what the diverse interests say,” he said. “It will not include our opinions because we don’t have opinions. We are a neutral third party.”

That’s not quite what Democratic Rep. Dean Takko of Longview envisioned when he helped persuade leaders of his party to put the proviso in the budget. Takko, who sponsored the failed bill, hoped the skilled forces at the center could blaze a trail lawmakers could not.

“Myself and quite a number of other people think there’s something we need to address,” said Takko,.

Now, he’ll take whatever they provide this winter as a possible starting point for legislation in 2014.

“In all honesty, we probably will not be a whole lot further than when the session ended,” he said. “It’s a big enough issue that we have to take some baby steps forward.”

Another person interested in talking with Kern’s team is Jason Mercier, an analyst with the Washington Policy Center and member of the Washington Coalition for Open Government. The coalition strongly opposed Takko’s bill.

He sees no reason to change the Public Records Act. The problem isn’t he law, he said, but officials understanding of it. Many do not realize what tools are already available to them when someone submits one of those so-called burdensome requests.

He suggested lawmakers asked the wrong question with the budget proviso. Leaders in local governments say hefty requests can chew up staff time and taxpayer dollars, but there’s no data on how much time and money is wasted to back up their claims, he said. Getting the answer would really inform the discussion, he said.

Sounds like something a public records request, or two, could clear up.

 

Jerry Cornfield is a political reporter who covers Olympia for The Daily Herald in Everett, which is among the Washington state newspapers in the Sound Publishing group. He can be contacted at jcornfield@heraldnet.com.

More in Opinion

Viewers in the gallery applaud as Gov. Jay Inslee makes his annual state-of-the state address before a joint legislative session Tuesday in Olympia. (Elaine Thompson / Associated Press)
Inslee: ‘It’s our state’s destiny … to fight climate change’

In his State-of-the-State address, the governor made the case for an ambitious carbon tax.

Inslee: ‘It’s our state’s destiny … to fight climate change’

In his State-of-the-State address, the governor made the case for an ambitious carbon tax.

Eyman isn’t letting a bad 2017 slow him down in the new year | The Petri Dish

The year ended as Eyman did not get enough signatures for a ballot to reduce car tab fees.

Displaced by a hurricane: Disaster relocation lessons

Editor’s note: This is the last of a three-part series by Bellevue… Continue reading

Gov. Jay Inslee speaks with Sound Publishing staff during a meeting on Jan. 20 at the Bellevue Reporter office. Photo by Matt Phelps/Kirkland Reporter
Judge delivers crushing blow to Inslee’s Clean Air Rule

It was the centerpiece of the governor’s crusade against climate change. Now it’s gone.

KCLS unveils its Best Books of 2017

And the envelope, please. Continuing an end-of-year tradition that dates back more… Continue reading

Displaced by a hurricane: The quest for housing | Guest Column

Woman describes challenges of helping family move from Puerto Rico to Bellevue

Firearms banned from state Senate gallery during sessions | The Petri Dish

Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib calls for prohibiting overcoats, large bags

Is someone you love experiencing memory loss? There’s a road map to help | Guest Column

By Shirley Newell Aegis Living At first, it might seem inconsequential, misplaced… Continue reading

What tax reform means here at home | Guest Column

Tax reform proposals swirling around Washington, D.C. right now make some sweeping… Continue reading

Global warming impacts | Letter

10-year-old writes about climate change concerns

Tax overhaul plan does not add up, Democrats insist | The Petri Dish

A tax overhaul plan drawn up by Republicans in Congress will be… Continue reading