Letters to the Editor, March 8, 2019

Candidates; PSE

Tree candidates

At the Leadership Gathering, “Talking about Trees” on Feb. 26, Jennifer Robertson was in attendance. One resident brought up the 300 trees that Puget Sound Energy (PSE) plans to cut down on 148th Avenue this year for the Lake Hills transmission line. This directly contradicts the city’s tree canopy goals to reach 40 percent tree canopy.

I missed an opportunity to point out that Robertson was the only one on the council to vote against the project originally back in 2015. One of the best ways to increase the tree canopy in Bellevue is to re-elect Jennifer Roberson this November. She stays true to her principles, and fights for residents — and trees. Her presence on the council is crucial to help Bellevue take real action to increase our tree canopy — and to avoid more PSE projects that negatively affect citizens at our own expense.

With Jennifer Roberson and Stephanie Walter on the council, the residents of this great city would finally have a majority of council members who legitimately care about our environment and listen to their constituents. Vote them onto the council in November if you want trees instead of lip service.

Fiona Cofield

Bellevue

Not needed

Why spend over $300 million for something that is not needed?

That’s what Puget Sound Energy’s (PSE) Energize Eastside (EE) project will cost ratepayers. EE includes 18 miles of new transmission lines running through neighborhoods and parks from Renton to Redmond. PSE’s claims that these new lines are needed for our growing energy needs which belies the facts. According to PSE’s own data, energy consumption has remained stable despite growth in population and jobs on the Eastside.

PSE’s application for a conditional use permit for the South Bellevue portion of EE will be determined by a Bellevue hearing examiner after a public hearing on March 28 at Bellevue City Hall at 6 pm. Show up to let the hearing examiner know that residents of Bellevue don’t want to pay higher electricity rates for a project that benefits PSE’s foreign investors without any measurable benefit to Eastside residents.

Kristi Weir

Bellevue

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