From left, Frannie Ronan, 9, and St. Madeleine Sophie Catholic School principal Martine Romero pose with Mariner Moose on Dec. 13. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

From left, Frannie Ronan, 9, and St. Madeleine Sophie Catholic School principal Martine Romero pose with Mariner Moose on Dec. 13. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo

St. Madeleine Sophie Catholic School nationally recognized as a Special Olympics Unified Champion School

The Catholic school is the first and only elementary school in Washington state to be recognized.

On Thursday, Dec. 13, St. Madeleine Sophie Catholic School held a special assembly to celebrate their national recognition as an inclusive school. Together with school staff, Special Olympics representatives, archdiocesan, and Mariner Moose, the students celebrated the arrival of their Special Olympics Unified Champion School banner.

Of 38 school and universities, St. Madeleine Sophie School was one of only eight elementary school across the country, and the only elementary-level National Banner school in Washington.

St. Madeleine Sophie School was one of only eight elementary school across the country, and the only elementary level National Banner school in Washington. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

St. Madeleine Sophie School was one of only eight elementary school across the country, and the only elementary level National Banner school in Washington. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

“It’s important to us to earn this recognition because our school has always been inclusive,” said principal Martine Romero. “It’s an amazing honor and we’re extremely blessed with our families and with our staff who embrace inclusion, and with our students who live it so authentically everyday.”

The Special Olympics Unified Champion School program aims to promote social inclusion through intentionally planned and implemented activities affecting system-wide change.

In order for a school to qualify, they must meet Special Olympics Unified Champion School standards. There are 10 standards of excellence that a national banner school must achieve in the categories of Special Olympics Unified Sports and Young Athletes, inclusive youth leadership, whole school engagement, and sustainability.

St. Madeleine achieved all of these standards by implementing inclusive sports, inclusive youth leadership opportunities and whole school engagement.

“You are changing the world in a way that people haven’t been able to do,” president and CEO of Special Olympics Washington Dave Lenox said to the students. “You matter. What you do matters.”

On Dec. 13, St. Madeleine Sophie Catholic School held a special assembly to celebrate their national recognition for being an inclusive school. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

On Dec. 13, St. Madeleine Sophie Catholic School held a special assembly to celebrate their national recognition for being an inclusive school. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

The school also received a special message from the executive director of Special Olympics International Tim Shriver. Shriver congratulated the St. Madeleine community and gave a special shout out to Frannie Ronan who participated in the Special Olympics USA Games in Seattle in July.

“Congratulations to all of you for doing what I think is the most important work in the world today,” Shriver said. “[You’re] proving that we can include one another and open up our hearts.”

Ronan, a third-grade student at St. Madeleine, participated in the games in July and won two Silver and Bronze medals in gymnastics. Ronan, who has Down Syndrome, was the youngest athlete to participate in the games. She was 8 years old at the time.

Frannie Ronan participated in the Special Olympics USA Games in Seattle in July and took home two Bronze and Silver medals in gymnastics. Ronan was the youngest athlete to participate in the games. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

Frannie Ronan participated in the Special Olympics USA Games in Seattle in July and took home two Bronze and Silver medals in gymnastics. Ronan was the youngest athlete to participate in the games. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

St. Madeleine’s president for mission and advancement Dan Sherman encouraged the students to continue being a light wherever they went.

To learn about St. Madeleine Sophie Catholic School, go online to www.smsbellevue.org.

Mariner Moose helped congratulate St. Madeleine Sophie students on Dec. 13. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

Mariner Moose helped congratulate St. Madeleine Sophie students on Dec. 13. Stephanie Quiroz/staff photo.

More in News

July’s Monroe earthquake is informing plans for future danger

Gathered by lucky accident, data from the 4.6-magnitude quake could help assess bigger hazards.

Bellevue lab and associates accused of kickback scheme

Defendants face up to 10 years in prison.

Metro seeking community input on future RapidRide K-Line

Survey opened Nov. 12 for input about routes in Kirkland, Bellevue.

King County fined for sewer violations

King County was fined $105,000 for violating its water quality permit multiple… Continue reading

Deborah Kraft leads SOS discussion presentation for parents on Nov. 7. From left: Elizabeth Hannibal, Stephanie Lawrenson, Deborah Kraft, Alicia Williams, Katherine Farkas, Piper Sangston. Madison Miller / staff photo
BSD introduces new suicide prevention program

Two parent information sessions were held.

Political activist Tim Eyman campaigns for Initiative 976 on Nov. 5 in downtown Bellevue. The initiative promised $30 car tabs while functionally eliminating the ability of agencies like Sound Transit to raise taxes for its projects. Photo by Aaron Kunkler
Election analysis: Eastside cities largely voted against I-976

Most Eastside cities weren’t swayed by I-976, though more voters approved it than the county average.

City council weighs in on potential gas tax replacement

The council heard and then responded to results from a Road Usage Charge Pilot project.

A King County judge found the company misled customers into thinking it was a charity. Photo courtesy of the state Attorney General’s office
Judge rules Value Village deceived customers

The King County judge found the company misled customers into thinking it was a charity.

Most Read