Lake Sammamish Park plan wins award

The Sunset Beach Bathhouse project at Lake Sammamish State Park has been selected as one of the region’s top 10 greenest projects. The project was recognized in the ‘What Makes it Green?” Awards by the Seattle chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

  • Monday, June 2, 2008 3:23pm
  • News

The Lake Sammamish bathhouse project is proposed for funding in the 2009-2011 budget period.

The Sunset Beach Bathhouse project at Lake Sammamish State Park has been selected as one of the region’s top 10 greenest projects. The project was recognized in the ‘What Makes it Green?” Awards by the Seattle chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

The competition included 56 built and “unbuilt” projects throughout the Northwest and Pacific region, including Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Idaho, Japan, Montana, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia.

In 2005, The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission began work with the public on a master plan to redevelop facilities and restore natural areas at Lake Sammamish State Park. The Sunset Beach bathhouse is the first building to be developed as part of this master plan.

“Redevelopment of Lake Sammamish gives us a rare opportunity to make cutting edge, sustainable design accessible to literally millions of people who visit the park,” said Peter Herzog, project manager. “We’re thrilled with how Patano Hafermann Architects has taken green building to the next level, turning it into iconic architecture that suits the park perfectly.”

“I’m elated, and I’m grateful that the community has embraced State Parks’ role in becoming a model of ‘green’ development,” said Rex Derr, State Parks director.

The bathhouse is proposed for funding in the 2009-2011 budget period. Construction will be primarily of concrete clad with recycled cedar slats. Portions of the building’s roof will be planted with drought tolerant vegetation, while other sections will use a transparent solar panel-roof system to cover outdoor seating areas.

The building will serve partly as a picnic shelter and will house restrooms, concessions area and lifeguard base.

Modular concrete components have flexibility to form a variety of enclosures and provide a durable frame that can adapt to different uses over time. Natural ventilation, day lighting, planted roofs, reclaimed cedar siding, low-flow, waterless plumbing fixtures and photovoltaic (PV) panels are among the green strategies incorporated into the bathhouse. The PV roof panels power the buildings and provide educational opportunity for the park users, while allowing light to filter through to the covered outdoor spaces.

Storm water is managed on-site with green roofs, rain gardens, and bio-swales to aid in the restoration and rehabilitation of existing wetlands.

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