Green-Theory manager says city’s first pot shop ready for business

Bellevue's first recreational marijuana shop, Green-Theory, opened its doors at noon Monday after several months coordinating with the city and state liquor control board.

Heidi Arsenault of Bellevue

Bellevue’s first recreational marijuana shop, Green-Theory, opened its doors at noon Monday after several months coordinating with the city and state liquor control board.

“We finally were able to all collaborate and make it happen,” said Green-Theory Manager Tera Martin. “We did an awesome buildout. We were really trying to go for a marijuana retail boutique.”

Catering to its Bellevue market, Martin said the store supplies some of the best producer and processor brands of marijuana products, as well as high-end smoking devices. Staff received training on how to check customer IDs on Friday from a liquor control board representative.

Green-Theory waited until opening day to make the announcement, Martin said, to avoid long-standing lines at the shop. For the first three weeks, she said soft opening hours will be noon to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday.  This should ease customers in and allow Green-Theory to assess its supply compared to demand, Martin said.

The store opened at noon, ushering in its first two customers. Heidi Arsenault had gone to the opening of Cannabis City, Seattle’s first pot shop, and was 13th in line. She was first through Green-Theory’s doors on Monday.

“I live in Meydbenbauer Bay and I’ve been driving by here waiting for this to open, and then I got news about a week ago that it was going to open, so me and some other people who live in this area came down – the first store in Bellevue,” she said, adding she is saving her green for a special occasion.

The shop will get its first supply of edibles on Friday, and is also offering concentrates. State law allows transactions of up to 28 grams of cannabis, and Martin said Green-Theory will be assessing the average amount purchased by customers to address future supply needs.

“I think we’re pretty solid and ready to go,” Martin said.

Green-Theory is located at 10697 Main St.

 

 

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