Bellevue festivals fill downtown with artists, color | Photos

Thousands clogged the streets of Downtown Bellevue this weekend to celebrate the arts in three simultaneous festivals. The main show, put on by the Bellevue Arts Museum, had hundreds of artists showing their craftsmanship at the Bellevue Square parking garage.

A woman dances at the Bellevue Arts Fair in downtown as a part of the festival attractions.

Thousands clogged the streets of Downtown Bellevue this weekend to celebrate the arts in three simultaneous festivals. The main show, put on by the Bellevue Arts Museum, had hundreds of artists showing their craftsmanship at the Bellevue Square parking garage.

Children were invited to participate in a number of activities, including a chalk art demonstration, where they filled Sixth Street with drawings.

Live music and a few food vendors kept the crowds moving along. The event runs through Sunday night.

Laura Walton buys a small glass sculpture at the Bellevue Arts Festival. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Artist Mike Capp works on a piece during the Bellevue Festival of the Arts. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Dancers hang from artist Sarena Mann’s tent at the Bellevue Festival of the Arts. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Lauren Monohan works on her contribution to the Towers Wonder. Children wrapped sticks in material and then added them to two towers. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Artist David Smith, right, displayed his glassware at the Sixth Street Fair. He chats with Charles Friedman, who created the glass ornaments to the left. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Brendan Wires performs at the Bellevue Sixth Street Fair July 28. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Amelia, left, and Natalie Owens use street chalk on Sixth Street in Bellevue as a part of the Bellevue Arts Museum’s chalk art exhibit this weekend. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Nancy Meyer, a festival goer, enjoys a display at the Bellevue Arts Fair on July 28. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Mary Fesler and dog Jack respond to a caricature Nolan Harris, right, drew of the pooch. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

Crowds and artists filled the road behind Bellevue Square July 28 at the Bellevue Arts Fair. BY CELESTE GRACEY, BELLEVUE REPORTER

More in News

King County Correctional Facility is located at 500 5th Ave., Seattle. File photo
King County jail’s leaky pipes have national implications

Lawsuit filed in King County Superior Court alleges Aquatherm has been selling faulty pipes.

Council candidates for Position 1 speak to level of service, growth, and homelessness

The candidates are incumbent John Stokes, Holly Zhang and Martin Acevedo.

VoteWA is a $9.5 million program that came online last May and is meant to unify all 39 county voting systems in the state into a single entity. Courtesy image
WA’s new voting system concerns county elections officials

VoteWA has run into some problems in recent months as the Aug. 6 primary election draws closer.

Bellevue PD: 153 firework reports made on temporary heat map tool

Improvements to be made, tool expected to return next year

Islamic Center Approved to Rebuild on Damaged Building’s Footprint

After being hit by two arsons since 2017, the Islamic Center of Eastside is on its way to a rebuild

From left, JD Yu, Janice Zahn, Mark Wilson
City Council candidate profiles, Pos. 5

Mark Wilson, incumbent Janice Zahn, and JD Yu.

From left, candidate Margie Ye, Jennifer Robertson and James Bible. Courtesy photos
City Council candidate profiles, Pos. 7

James Bible, incumbent Jennifer Robertson, and Margie Ye.

An aerial photo shows the locations of two earthquakes and five aftershocks in and near Monroe, which rattled the Puget Sound region early Friday. The first was the magnitude 4.6 quake at upper right, 13 miles under the intersection of U.S. 2 and Fryelands Boulevard SE at 2:51 a.m. The second, magnitude 3.5, occurred 18 miles under the Old Snohomish-Monroe Road at 2:53 a.m. The aftershocks followed during the ensuing two hours. This image depicts an area about 3 miles wide. (Herald staff and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network)
Early wake-up call: Twin quakes under Monroe rattle region

Thousands of people felt them. They were magnitude 4.6 and 3.5 and hit minutes apart.

Most Read