Bellevue Council adopts Comprehensive Plan amendments | Council Roundup

The council also appointed Mohammad Malakoutian to the Planning Commission

  • Friday, December 15, 2017 1:21pm
  • News

During the Bellevue City Council meeting on Monday, council members approved and discussed the following items:

Planning Commission appointment

By a vote of 6 to 1, the council appointed Mohammad Malakoutian to the Planning Commission. Councilmember Jennifer Robertson voted against the appointment. Malakoutian, whose term will run until May 2021, will serve in the Position 1 seat.

The Planning Commission is comprised of seven Bellevue residents who are appointed by the mayor with the approval of the council. The commission reviews and proposes amendments to the Comprehensive Plan, and makes recommendations to the council, using public input, on land use issues.

Comprehensive Plan amendments adopted

The council also unanimously adopted four proposed 2017 amendments to the city’s Comprehensive Plan. They include the Eastgate Office Park and the Old Seattle Times Building site-specific amendments, and city-sponsored Complete Streets policies (Transportation Element) and Downtown Transportation Plan amendments to the Downtown Subarea Plan.

Of note was the adopted Downtown Subarea Plan amendment, which was modified based on direction from council members after the Nov. 27 study session. Much of the discussion, and changes, focused on encouraging all modes of travel in the area.

The Comprehensive Plan is the city’s foundational policy document, which helps guide growth and development. Under the Growth Management Act, plans can only be amended once a year so that the cumulative effect of any changes can be considered. As part of this process, Bellevue works on private and city-initiated proposals.

East Main redevelopment guiding principles

Council members approved a slate of guiding principles for the redevelopment area east of the future East Main light rail station. The new principles will be used by the Planning Commission as it develops recommendations for the Comprehensive Plan amendment, Land Use Code amendment (LUCA) and legislative rezone of commercial properties east of 112th Avenue Southeast between Main Street, Southeast Eighth Street and Interstate 405. The principles articulate the council’s expectations related to the process, schedule and focus of the work. The Planning Commission will take up the project in January.

At its Nov. 13 meeting, the council approved a process that will save time by allowing the LUCA, Comprehensive Plan amendments and rezone to be worked on concurrently. The city estimates that this approach for the East Main area will result in completion of the project in about one year as opposed to the typical sequential process that can take up to two years or more.

The full list of principles and more background can be found in the council agenda packet.

More in News

Police exercise educates drivers and pedestrians on safety

Bellevue police increase emphasis on collision causes.

Despite concerns, homelessness authority moves toward final Seattle vote

Seattle’s homelessness committee aligned the city’s plan with King County’s.

King County’s current climate action plan was adopted in 2015 and has provided a blueprint for reducing emissions and preparing for climate change. File photo
King County approves environmental justice provision

An update to the King County climate action plan should include an… Continue reading

Homelessness authority approved by King County, awaits Seattle vote

The agreement would consolidate emergency services for people experiencing homelessness.

The King County Courthouse is located at 516 Third Ave. in downtown Seattle. Photo courtesy of King County
Council approves $600,000 to increase security at King County Courthouse

The funding will be split evenly between increasing deputies, security and social services.

Victims, law enforcement speak about King County Courthouse conditions

An entrance to the courthouse was closed after an assault.

Washington Low Income Housing Alliance is among supporters of statewide “just cause” legislation to protect tenants in Washington. However, some landlords say removing the ability to quickly remove tenants limits their ability to get rid of problem renters. (Courtesy image)
Tenant advocates prepare for another push in Olympia

Following wins in Burien and Federal Way, just cause evictions are on the 2020 Legislative agenda.

Bellevue skyline. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Bellevue changing logo for the first time since 1969

New logo to reflect diversity, development.

Most Read