Bellevue College breaks ground on student housing

  • Wednesday, May 10, 2017 11:51am
  • News

Today the Bellevue College community and local leaders celebrated the groundbreaking of the new student housing facility. Slated for occupancy in the fall of 2018, the project—designed to be highly sustainable—accommodates 350 beds in a mixture of units.

“Today we follow in the footsteps of the College’s first groundbreaking in 1966, by breaking ground on our first student housing facility,” said Dr. Jill Wakefield, interim president of Bellevue College. “We recognize how far this campus has come, and look to a future where students will have new opportunities, and spaces, to live, learn, and thrive.”

Bellevue College’s enrollment is expected to grow at a rate of 1.8 percent annually. With limited housing available nearby, and an increase in full-time and international students, the college was quick to move on the plan.

“We’ve long recognized Bellevue College’s value to our community,” said Mayor John Stokes. “Through our vision priorities, the City Council made a firm commitment to support the College’s efforts to develop student housing. This latest enhancement to Bellevue College will only improve the academic experience for those seeking higher education in our city.”

Currently under construction, the first phase of Bellevue College’s new student housing development will deliver a 147 unit residential community, transforming the campus into a living, breathing 24/7 neighborhood that offers a sense of security, and promotes the well-being and academic achievement of students.

The building will house apartment style units with studios, 2-bedroom studios and 4-bedroom apartments. It will also offer community spaces where students can collaborate and socialize. Sustainability is a primary component of the design, with the goal to achieve LEED Gold Certification status.

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