News

Bellevue's Knotty Bodies espresso stand covers up—for now

Top: Baristas at the Knotty Bodies Espresso stand are no longer wearing bikinis or lengerie. Bottom: The Knotty Bodies sign, which used to depict the backside of a topless woman, is now covered with tape, and reads
Top: Baristas at the Knotty Bodies Espresso stand are no longer wearing bikinis or lengerie. Bottom: The Knotty Bodies sign, which used to depict the backside of a topless woman, is now covered with tape, and reads 'Not Espresso.'
— image credit: Joshua Adam Hicks / Bellevue Reporter

The controversial Knotty Bodies espresso stand near Crossroads Park has toned down its risque image, reportedly because of pressure from the property owner.

The normally bikini- and lingerie-clad baristas were wearing jeans and tank tops or long-sleeve shirts Thursday as they worked a slow night.

A sign on the business previously depicting the backside of a topless woman along with the words "Knotty Bodies Espresso" was covered with red tape to read "Not Espresso," with no female image.

"This is very temporary," said a barista who goes by the name Kat. "We'll be back to doing sexy coffee."

Maybe not, according to the city.

"They're working with the property owner or Chevron to adjust their business," said Bellevue development services director Mike Brennan. "We understand they're contemplating relocating."

Knotty Bodies is located on leased space in the parking lot of the Chevron station at NE Eighth St. and 164th Ave. NE.

Residents are concerned about the proximity of the business to Crossroads Park, which is frequented by children.

The espresso stand opened Nov. 21 as a drive through, but the city closed down that aspect of the operation four days later because the drive through was unauthorized.

Since then, Knotty Bodies has only been allowed to serve walk-up customers.

Bellevue City Council members expressed mostly disdain for the operation at their Nov. 23 meeting, during which residents packed the room in a show of opposition to the business.

"We still have more supporters than opponents," Kat said.

Asked if business has been slower since she and her co-workers started donning more clothes, Kat said: "People drive by and see us in our clothes. They don't know what the hype's about."

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Jul 18 edition online now. Browse the archives.