Lifestyle

Getting organized | Stacey Anderson can show you how to get a handle on your stuff

Stacey Anderson tells her clients to stay on top of their organizing by doing one small thing a day that gets them toward their organizing goal. - Chad Coleman/Bellevue Reporter
Stacey Anderson tells her clients to stay on top of their organizing by doing one small thing a day that gets them toward their organizing goal.
— image credit: Chad Coleman/Bellevue Reporter

After a long week, Stacey Anderson, like anyone else, might be found relaxing with a glass of wine.

However, while sipping her merlot, she also is likely to be organizing stacks and stacks of papers.

“I love doing paper,” said Anderson, of Bellevue. “Most people don’t sit at home on a Friday night with a glass of wine and say, ‘Let’s go through the filing cabinet.’”

Anderson, a professional organizer, came out with a book in March, “Get Organized: Get Revitalized, 80 Quick and Easy Tips to Get You Started.”

For the past three years, Anderson has been writing a tip of the week for her Web site. Taking her favorites, she created an easy guide for people to get started on becoming organized.

“It shouldn’t be so hard. Everybody makes it so hard. I just wanted something really simple that people could reference to,” Anderson said.

Statistics show that people spend on average 55 minutes every day looking for items they know they have but can’t find, Anderson noted.

Anderson’s goal is to teach people how to be organized on their own, giving them the skills, processes and reasons behind getting organized, so they can regain that lost hour.

One of Anderson’s clients, Marlene Meyer, can attest for the difference organization has made in her life.

“[I feel] like I can move on to things that I really want to do because I’m not overwhelmed with the junk,” Meyer said.

How to let go of nostalgic items is one of the most important skills Meyer gained from working with Anderson.

“Do you really want this sitting around? Does it bring enjoyment to your life?” Meyer learned to ask herself.

Working in several three-hour segments, Anderson helped Meyer clear out seven carloads of things she realized she didn’t need or want in her home.

Anderson tells her clients to stay on top of their organizing by doing one small thing a day that gets them toward their organizing goal.

“Whether that’s one drawer, picking up five items, timing yourself and cleaning for 10 minutes, just one small thing a day helps you achieve or maintain your goal,” Anderson said.

For more tips, Anderson’s book can be purchased from her Web site, www.organizedinnovations.com.

Shauna Nuckles is a student in the University of Washington Department of Communication News Laboratory.

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