Jaden, 3-years-old, meets Probationary Firefighter Chuck Terrell at the Fire Department Open House on Saturday, Oct. 13. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Jaden, 3-years-old, meets Probationary Firefighter Chuck Terrell at the Fire Department Open House on Saturday, Oct. 13. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Bellevue Fire Department welcomes community at the annual open house

The Bellevue Fire Department once again held their annual open house event on Saturday, Oct. 13.

This weekend, families had the opportunity to explore a fire truck, learn proper fire safety procedure, and speak with Bellevue firefighters.

As part of National Fire Prevention Week, the Bellevue Fire Department once again held its annual open house event on Saturday, Oct. 13.

All nine of the city’s fire stations held an open house event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., serving refreshments and teaching visitors lessons on fire safety.

At Station 3 (16100 NE Eighth St.), fire department Chief Jay Hagen watched over the demonstrations and tours, and he met with families attending the open house.

“We are trying to do everything we can to connect with the community and impart some safety message on the people that are taking the time to come by,” Hagen said.

A kitchen fire demonstration and lesson was held at Station 3 led by Fire Prevention Officer Gelm Albright. The department had an oven outside of the station and lit a fire in a frying pan to show the audience what to do (and what not to do) when faced with a kitchen fire.

“We also are hosting the Somerset Women for Medic One. They are here with a CPR demonstration and they are community volunteers that have been supporting our medic one program for many, many years,” Hagen said. “We have AmeriCorps volunteers here that are part of the fire department. I just ran into Bellevue city Councilmember Janice Zahn here interacting with the community.”

The State Fire Marshal’s Office also attended the event with a special trailer that conducted demonstrations of a home sprinkler system to promote people to install those systems in their homes. A fire was set behind glass and audiences watched as the flames climbed to the ceiling and were quickly doused by the sprinkler.

Of course the fire engine tours were the most popular with the children all day, with fire fighters talking with kids and teaching them how the equipment is used.

“With the younger generation, our fire engine tours are really popular,” Hagen said. “So we get a lot of kids in the fire engine and talking to the fire fighters.”

Fire Prevention Officer Gelm Albright walks the audience through the proper steps to take to put out a kitchen fire. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Fire Prevention Officer Gelm Albright walks the audience through the proper steps to take to put out a kitchen fire. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Kids at the Fire Department’s open house sit together on the back of a Fire Engine. From left: Olivia Chan, Aiden Chan, Philip Farah, James Farah, and Austin Vo. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Kids at the Fire Department’s open house sit together on the back of a Fire Engine. From left: Olivia Chan, Aiden Chan, Philip Farah, James Farah, and Austin Vo. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Engineer Firefighter John Harn teaches kids about the various equipment a Fire Engine carries. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Engineer Firefighter John Harn teaches kids about the various equipment a Fire Engine carries. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Deputy Washington State Fire Marshal Lysandra Davis, left, explains the benefits of a home sprinkler system during a demonstration of the sprinkler response time. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Deputy Washington State Fire Marshal Lysandra Davis, left, explains the benefits of a home sprinkler system during a demonstration of the sprinkler response time. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo